MIA Facts Site

Tom Abraham:
His Claims
vs.
The Facts

SUMMARY.  You should have come to this page from the first article about Tm Abraham.  If you have not read that article, click on this link, read the article, then come back to this article -- there is a link on the other page to this one.

Tom Abraham, a British citizen, served as a lieutenant in the 1st Cavalry Division during the Vietnam War.  In October 2002 he published a book title The Cage.  In his book Abraham claimed, among other things, that he was captured by the "Viet Cong," held forseveral days, then escaped and made his way back to his unit.  This claim is not true; Abraham was never a prisoner nor was he ever missing form his unit.

As people who knew Abraham began to learn of his book and the claims therein, more and more misrepresentations, exxagerations, and falsehoods were discovered.   The following is a document that was prepared by one individual from contributions by several others.  The author is himself British, a Vietnam veteran, now a US citizen, and an investigator with a US federal law enforcement agency.  Contributors to this document are identified in the document.  This document addresses a number of the claims made by Abraham in The Cage and demonstrates that Mr. Abraham has told much less -- or perhaps, much more -- than the truth.

Notes on this document.  There are footnotes in this document -- they are collected at the end.  Exhibits and sources are listed at the end.

 

The purpose of this document is to address claims made by Thomas Abraham in his recent autobiography entitled The Cage, published by Bantam Press. 

 Concurrent with the UK publication of the book, Abraham was interviewed by Tim Sebastian on the BBC television program Hard Talk, on October 18, 2002 1. Abraham was further featured on a BBC Radio Shropshire on October 25, 2002 when Jon King interviewed him 2, and on the BBC Radio 4 program The Choice, where Michael Buerk interviewed him on November 19, 2002 3.    The autobiography details Abraham’s growing up in England, emigration to the United States of America, where at the age of 19 he joined the United States Army in February 1966.  His commissioning as a 2d Lieutenant in the Army and his assignment to the 1st Cavalry Division in Vietnam as a rifle platoon leader.   Following his service in the United States Army, Abraham returned to live in the United Kingdom. 

The premise of the autobiography The Cage is that in England, some thirty years after his service in Vietnam, Abraham experiences a “flash back” which resurrects long suppressed memories of his imprisonment by the Viet Cong during the Tet Offensive of 1968.

 In his preface to the book, which is dedicated to the men of the 1st Cavalry Division, United States Army, Abraham makes the following statement:  

“Memory is fallible, and it is possible that few of the incidents I have described did not happen in the exact sequence shown. Nevertheless, I have tried to provide a faithful picture of events as they occurred within these inevitable limits.  Names and certain other details have been changed for the usual reasons” 

Fully recognizing that memory is indeed fallible we have endeavored to be fair in addressing the claims that Abraham has made.  Events that can be supported by records, or the recollections of persons who served with Abraham are recorded below.  Those claims made by Abraham, that are unsupported by records, or contradicted by records, or the recollections of his compatriots are also reported. 

Our contention is not so much that his sequence is wrong, but that some incidents did not happen at all. In disputing his story we rely not only on the official records which are very complete, and which were inspected annually by the Military Assistance Command Vietnam Inspectors General while the war was in progress, but also on the personal testimony of men who were present during the real events, and had day to day contact with Abraham or his unit. Many of the witnesses whose testimony is set down have been disposed to be friendly to Abraham and remember him as a good soldier. All of these witnesses are taking valuable time from other endeavors to set the record straight where Abraham has perverted it.

 Unfortunately, the main events that give rise to the title and premise of the book never happened.  They are fabrications.  Lieutenant Thomas Francis Abraham, Company D, 5th Battalion, 7th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, United States Army Vietnam was never a prisoner of the Viet Cong.  There is no record of his capture or escape in any documents or records maintained by the United States Government.  Neither is there any record of Abraham’s claimed rescue of two downed United States Air Force pilots during his tour in Vietnam.  Abraham has further embellished other events and his account of those events is at variance with those who served with him.  Also of note is the fact that none of the men whom Abraham names in the book as being killed in action appear in the Vietnam Casualty Data Base.  We have attempted to correct that by listing the actual names of the men of the 5th Battalion, 7th Cavalry who were killed in action during that time period, and who appear to represent the fictitious names in Abraham’s book.  Perhaps Abraham’s memory has been fallible in this regard, but to those others who served with him, their memory is clear.  To quote Bob Trimble Many of the names used in the book are fictitious, maybe he doesn't remember their names.  Unfortunately I remember all too well.  The names of these heroes are indexed in Exhibit 9.

During the course of the involvement of the United States Army in Vietnam, units involved in that action maintained various records.  These records included Morning Reports that were maintained by Company level units, and are currently available from the National Personnel Records Center, Military Personnel Records Section in St. Louis, Missouri.  Morning Reports are created by military organizations as part of their personnel and payroll functions and are created each morning, as the name implies.  They are an "exception based" system, only containing information on those individuals who are not "Present and Accounted for".  Among the reasons for being listed on a morning report are:

bulletPromotion or demotion
bulletBeing killed, wounded or missing in action
bulletBeing assigned to a unit, or leaving a unit
bulletGoing to a hospital for treatment, or to another activity for training
bulletLeave of absence

In addition, the following individuals would have been in direct daily contact with Abraham and had a DUTY to report Abraham’s missing status.

bulletThe Company commander who would have been in hourly or more frequent contact by radio and face-to-face.
bulletAbraham’s platoon sergeant who would have been in constant contact, would have had to report to Abraham and would have reported his absence and his (the platoon sergeant’s) assumption of command
bulletAbraham’s Squad leaders
bulletAbraham’s Battalion operations officer- note that Major Baker assumed command of a rifle company at one point in the Tet battle
bulletAbraham’s Battalion commander

The following individuals would have had a DUTY to report Abraham’s recovery

bulletThe recovering platoon leader
bulletThe recovering company commander
bulletThe recovering battalion S-3
bulletThe recovering battalion commander
bulletThe recovering battalion medics who treated him
bulletThe recovering battalion intelligence officer who "debriefed" him
bulletThe aircraft commander of the helicopter which was dispatched to pick him up
bulletThe battalion operations officer of the aviation battalion

Abraham contends that NONE of these people carried out their most basic duty of accounting for and caring for the soldiers committed to their charge for a period of four full days in a unit which was well organized well disciplined and highly experienced in combat operations. This is out of a brigade that produced a future Chief of Staff of the US Army, four stars; three future LTG, three stars; and two BG out of a total of ten battalion
commanders who commanded one of the four battalions in the Third Brigade. The standards of performance in that brigade were very high, and it is appropriate to note that the Third Brigade was selected for the lead role in all of the First Cavalry Division assaults or independent operations for the twelve months from July 1967 to June 1968.  Two of those commanders who reached General rank commanded the 5th battalion while Abraham was a member, and one of the commanders who reached General rank was Abraham’s commanding officer in B Company.

Other records researched are Battalion Daily Journals of the 5th Battalion, 7th Cavalry Regiment available through the National Archives Records Administration (NARA). We have also utilized the information available on the various Internet websites maintained by the United States Government.  In addition, we have referenced the personal recollections of those who were present and witnessed some of the activities that Abraham reports in his book.    Also used are records available from the National Personnel Records Center, Military Personnel Records Section concerning Thomas Abraham’s service in the United States Army 4 and 5.  All of the resources utilized have been indexed in the page footnotes to this document, and some of the more important records are appended as Exhibits.

This document is not so much an effort to destroy the credibility of Thomas Francis Abraham, but rather an effort to tell the truth about the men of the 5th Battalion 7th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division in Vietnam, and to honor those who gave their lives in that war.

They shall not grow old as we that are left grow old:
Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn.
At the going down of the sun and in the morning
We shall remember them.

The Cage- An Englishman in Vietnam

Tom Abraham – ISBN 0593 049683

Published by Bantam Press 2002

 

In the following section, Abraham's claims are in normal type, the facts are in bold italic type.

Page 5/6 – Surrey, UK
January 1998 - Abraham is arrested for driving while intoxicated and transported by the Surrey Constabulary in the back of a van.  In that van, he experiences a “flashback” which brings back long suppressed memories of his imprisonment by the Vietcong in Vietnam some 31 years previously.  He equates the dark uniformed police officers that arrest him with the Vietcong who imprisoned him years before.

 

Page 17/20

January 1999 -Abraham attacks his wife with a knife. 

Page 43-79

February 1966 - Abraham enlists in the US Army.  Following Officer Candidate School at Fort Benning, he is assigned to Ft Dix. 

Military records obtained from the Military Personnel Records Center, National Archives Records Administration under the provisions of the Freedom of Information Act support Abraham’s account of enlistment and subsequent commissioning as a 2d Lieutenant in the United States Army 6.

 

Page 102/103

August 17, 1967 - Abraham is assigned as Platoon Leader 2d Platoon, Co B, 5th of the 7th Cav. At LZ English meets the Battalion Commander, a “Full Bird” Colonel wearing an ivory handled .45.  During a briefing by Capt. Matthews, Co B CO, at LZ Sandra, a “stray round pierces the tent and buries itself in a box”.  Capt. Matthews treats it matter of factly and carries on with the briefing.

 

Military records obtained from the Military Personnel Records Center, National Archives Records Administration under the provisions of the Freedom of Information Act indicate Abraham was assigned to the 5th Battalion, 7th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division on August 13, 1967   7.

The Battalion Commander during August 1967 was Lieutenant Colonel John A. Wickham Jr. (subsequently General - United States Army – Army Chief of Staff) 8 & 9. Don Bowman and Charlie Baker who were present at the Battalion or Brigade during this particular time frame state that none of the Commanders of the 5th Battalion ever wore an ivory handled side arm.

Page 123

September 1967 - 2d Platoon trips booby trap in village several wounded – one of Abraham’s men is killed, several others are wounded.

 From the recollection of Charlie Baker

On January 21, 1968, B Company had a patrol trip a mine that day.  4 men were WIA.  Sgt Archie Burnette of B Co was KIA.   

Page 129-130

An Loa north of An Khe – patrol comes under mortar attack – one man wounded.  That evening the Platoon sets an ambush, there is a firefight, but in the morning all that is found are blood trails.   

Page 135-137

September 5/6, 1967 – The patrol captures three VC in village.  Abraham has conflict with his Platoon Sgt and asks Matthews to reassign him.

Page 140

September 6/7, 1967 – Abraham’s platoon discovers the corpse of a US soldier tied to a tree.  The corpse has been skinned and has a brass pin (cavalry crossed sabers) impaled on its forehead.

 

Page 143

September 17, 1967 – Battle on Highway 19 – Six US personnel KIA, 7 US personnel wounded, 20 enemy are KIA,   1 captured.  Abraham later kills 1 enemy as the patrol sweeps the area following the battle the next day. 

Battalion records indicate that on Sept. 17 & 18, 1967 there was a battle on Highway 19. 20 enemy KIA, 2 enemy POW 1 enemy POW-WIA. B & D Companies involved.  According to Bob Trimble, Executive Officer of B Company, the company lost Sergeant First Class Wilfred Perez and Sergeant Clyde Paul who were KIA.

 

Page 151

September 18, 1967 – Abraham is ordered back to An Khe where he, “the colonel” and the soldier who captured the NVA are awarded the Silver Star at a full Battalion ceremony officiated over by the Commanding General of the Division – “a four star” General officer.  Several others receive decorations also. 

Military records obtained from the Military Personnel Records Center, National Archives Records Administration under the provisions of the Freedom of Information Act indicate Abraham was awarded the Silver Star 10.  However, the Commanding General of the 1st Cavalry Division during the time described by Abraham was Major General John J. Tolson III – a “two star” General 11 & 12.

Page 156-159

September 1967 – area of Tam Ky – D Company takes casualties of 12 KIA and 67 WIA.  Co B is sent in to relieve Co D by attacking from opposite side.   Abraham witnesses a fellow company B platoon leader decapitated by a rocket propelled grenade. 20 enemy are KIA. Abraham assaults machine gun position and is “put in” for a Bronze Star with V device for valor.

 According the Charlie Baker and Bob Trimble, the battle at Tam Ky was a major firefight involving all elements of the Battalion.  D Company suffered 11 KIA.  B Company had a platoon leader 1Lt Robert Sime also killed in action.  Bob Trimble, who was Lt Sime’s  best friend said that Lt Sime was killed by small arms fire on October 23, 1967 not an RPG.

 The inside cover of book “The Cage” shows a certificate for a Bronze Star Medal, awarded for the period August 1967 through August 1968 – for Meritorious Achievement – there is no indication it was for “Valor”.  Photo in book depicts Abraham in summer uniform wearing ribbons for Silver Star, Bronze Star with V device, Air Medal, Purple Heart with two clusters and some other ribbons.  Records obtained from the NARA St Louis do not indicate that there was any prior or subsequent award of the Bronze Star to Abraham for valor 13.  Had Abraham been awarded more than one Bronze Star – it would have been so indicated by an oak leaf cluster on the ribbon.

 Page 161-165

November 6, 1967 – Platoon walk into enemy ambush – three men are instantly killed Abraham is wounded when enemy round hits his rifle destroying it – Abraham hears an enemy voice say “Yankee you die” while he is lying wounded.  Abraham picks up a rifle from one his dead men and assaults the enemy machine gun position, throwing grenades and firing his weapon as he advances silencing the machine gun and killing two or three NVA

 On November 6, 1967 PFC’s Jumper and Leising of Company B, 5th of the 7th Cavalry Regiment were killed in action.  The account of action described by Abraham in pages 156 through 165 appear to mimic the actions of 1Lt Sprayberry, who on April 26, 1968 won the Medal Of Honor for his heroic actions in assaulting enemy machine gun positions while an officer in D Company, 5th Battalion, 7th Cavalry 14.

 Page 173

November 28, 1967 – Abraham is told that a Senior Sergeant who had replaced him while he was on in country R&R has been killed in a firefight.  Abraham claims that the Sergeant had been shot in the back of the head, and that in a conversation he had with Schroeder, Schroeder implied that the Sergeant had been murdered by his men.  Matthews warns Abraham to be on his guard

 On February 8, 1968, Abraham’s platoon sergeant, Sergeant First Class Wilfred Solomon, was killed in action while Abraham was on R&R in Hong Kong.  On his return from R & R, Abraham was reassigned to D Company as a platoon leader.  According to Bob Trimble, former B Company Executive Officer, SFC Solomon was a fine NCO and well respected by everyone in the company.

 Page 178

Abraham’s platoon is in village when a small child detonates a grenade in a coke can – three US WIA. Patrol kills two villagers in hut. 

Page 180

November 1967 - Abraham is looking through a scoped M-14 (he calls it an M-1) when he observes a three man Viet Cong Patrol leading two American prisoners.  Abraham deploys his platoon and sets an ambush where his men kill the three VC and rescue the two Americans.  Abraham determines that the two Americans were downed USAF Phantom crew who had been shot down and captured two months previously. 

According to Don Bowman who was formerly the Operations Officer for the 3d Brigade of the 1st Cavalry Division (to which the 7th Cavalry Regiment was assigned) there was no reported rescue of downed United States Air Force personnel by any unit assigned to the 3d Brigade.   Further, there is no record of any downed USAF personnel being “rescued” under the circumstances as described by Abraham during the entire time the United States was involved in Vietnam 15.   Had there been such a rescue by Abraham and his platoon, it should have been recorded in the 5th Battalion Daily Journal, as were the recoveries of other MIA’s  (note that 5 US personnel previously reported to be MIA during action of February 12 are indicated to have been recovered KIA – paragraph 1b)16.

 

Page 183

December 4, 1967 – transferred to weapons platoon – moves to LZ Colt. 

Page 184-188

December 11, 1967 (approx) – LZ Colt Abraham is on LZ Colt perimeter at .50 cal when a round hits the barrel and destroys the MG.  Around midnight enemy sappers attack the LZ with satchel charges.  The Colonel, the Battalion XO, and the Battalion SGM are all killed.  A “dozen” enemy are killed.

The battle for LZ Colt actually took place during October 1967 and is fully documented by records and the recollection of the Battalion commander LTC Wickham – who was not killed during the attack17.    Killed during the attack were Major Jim Moore, who was the Battalion S-3 Lt Pinchot, Captain Aubert, and Sp4 Davis

 Page 190-191

One of Abraham’s men commits suicide following the receipt of a “Dear John” letter from his girlfriend.  The man intentionally kills himself by firing a recoilless rifle while placing his body over the breech.

 

On October 25, 1967, the company returned to LZ Colt.  As part of the defenses of the LZ, a 106 mm recoilless rifle had been placed on the perimeter.  According to Bob Trimble, B Company Executive Officer, Cpl James Gish of Abraham’s platoon loaded a round into the breech of the rifle while standing directly behind the weapon.  The firing pin of the RR had stuck in the firing position, and on closing the breech the round detonated.  Cpl James Gish was instantly killed in the tragic accident.

 

Page 194

January 6-7, 1968 – LZ Shortie – enemy attacks LZ with flamethrowers killing one of Abraham’s men and some other US personnel.  The company renames LZ Shortie in the name of the deceased soldier.

 On January 7, 1968 the NVA attacked LZ Shortie with flamethrowers.  The 5th of the 7th Cav suffered two men KIA - Cpl Bailey of D company and PFC Raul Gutierrez of B company who was killed when an enemy grenade landed in his foxhole. 

Page 200

January 31, 1968 – Battalion combat assaults west of Hue – Abraham wounded by mortar fragment – treated in field. – Goes on R&R to Hong Kong. 

Page 208

February 1968 – returns from R&R and is reassigned to Co D – joins platoon in western suburbs of Hue reports house-to-house fighting.

 Bob Trimble recalls that following his return to duty, Abraham learned that his platoon sergeant had been killed in action while he (Abraham) was in Hong Kong.  Bob says that Abraham never got over that and was reassigned shortly thereafter.

  SFC Solomon was killed on February 8, 1968 while Abraham was on R & R.  Records obtained under the Freedom of Information Act indicate that Abraham was reassigned as Platoon leader Co D, 5th Battalion, 7th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division on 15 February 1968 18.  The 1st Cavalry Division launched the big attack on Feb 21, and it took about three days to get to the walls of Hue. For a complete account of the 3d Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division operations at Hue see 19 and 20. 

Page 211

February 1968 – position is assaulted by hundreds of NVA regulars. 

From the recollection of Charlie Baker.

After finally clearing TT Woods on the 21st, we attacked down Hwy 1 on 22-24 Feb.   We fought a major firefight astride the highway on 22d and 23d against maybe a company more likely a platoon delaying our advance. They were dug in burial mounds; got to the bridge into the Citadel on the 24th, and operated in the suburbs on the southwest corner of the Citadel through the 26th.  There was little fighting after the 23d.  Mop up.  D Co lost Pfc Whitlock on 24th.  C Co lost Sp4 Wilt on the 26th.

  On 27 Feb we moved out of the Hue suburbs, back up Hwy 1 to Thon La Chu (TT Woods) and straight north from there out into the villages north of the hwy.  We were in pursuit of an NVA Bn. We fought against their delay elements on the 27th and 28th with no one KIA, and caught up with them on 29th.  We had a major scrap and 4 men were killed in A Co.  Nick, Martin, Groat, and 1st Lt Watt.  On March 1 we were air extracted from a hot PZ and returned to Cp Evans.  At no time were we assaulted by 100 NVA except on 12 Feb at TT Woods, when Co C guarding the right flank repulsed a two-company counter-attack aimed at the flank and rear of our main attack.

Page 237-291

Late February 1968 – day after assault by hundreds of NVA regulars – the Company is advancing over paddy fields when it comes under fire.  Abraham is separated from platoon and is captured by 5 Viet Cong.  He is marched for the day through the paddies ascending the hills and into the jungle finally reaching a hut and is held there for about four hours.  Abraham is then led again during the nighttime until he arrives at dawn at a group of huts inhabited by male Viet Cong.  An NVA officer who speaks “perfect unaccented English” interrogates and tortures Abraham.  Following the interrogation, Abraham is taken to a “small lake about a hundred feet across”.   Abraham describes the “lake” as possibly being a bomb crater.  Abraham is then placed naked in a three feet by three feet bamboo cage that is then submerged in the water so that only his face is above the water.  The following morning Abraham is taken from the cage and interrogated again.  Following more torture and interrogation, Abraham is placed again in the cage.  He escapes that evening.  It appears that the main focus of the two-day interrogation and torture endured by Abraham is to elicit whether or not he is married.

 During his subsequent 2-day journey through the jungle, Abraham hallucinates and also remembers one of his men being attacked by a tiger. 

Page 284-287

 Abraham is rescued by a 1st Cav patrol after being missing for approximately 4 days and taken back to the battalion firebase where he is debriefed by MI for a “half hour or so”.  That evening, Abraham is flown back to Camp Evans where he meets his company commander who says “glad to have you back Abraham, Delighted to find you alive”.  No one in his unit expresses any interest in the fact that he had been captured and escapes.  Abraham states that he had been listed as MIA but the listing hadn’t reached Battalion HQ.

 The United States Government Defense Prisoner of War/Missing Personnel Office has no record of a Thomas Abraham being a Prisoner of War 21and 22.  It was further the policy of the United States that any returned POW’s be immediately evacuated from Vietnam.

 On November 29, 2002 Jay Veith visited the the National Archives Record Center where he researched the Battalion logs of the 5th Battalion, 7th Cavalry for February 1968 – there are no reports of any US personnel missing and unaccounted for during that month. Nor are there any reports of any US personnel returned to US control after capture.   Mr Veith, who is the author of the book “Code-Name Bright Light: The Untold Story of US POW Rescue Efforts During the Vietnam War,", also reviewed the official Joint Personnel Recovery Center Weekly Bright Light reports and reviewed the 1968 MACVSOG Command History, JPRC Annex, for any mention of Abraham.   There was none.  Don Bowman – formerly the S-3 of the 3d Brigade categorically, denies that Abraham was ever a Prisoner of War.   

From Charlie Baker

No one was captured in February or January or March.  5 men from D Co were killed in the 12 Feb battalion attack at TT Woods.  We disengaged as it was getting dark, and they were left on the field.  Attacks on the 13th, 14th and 14th were canceled for lack of artillery and air support, so on the night of the 15th Capt. Lambert led a patrol to get them back.  They got close enough to see the corpses but an illumination round fired by someone other than 5/7 Cav caused us to go no further.  These 5 MIA were recovered on Feb 21 when we took the objective.(also see battalion daily journal Exhibit 7).

 The following personnel who personally know Abraham and served with him in Vietnam also state that his story of capture by the enemy and subsequent escape are untrue.

Howard Prince – Formerly Commanding Officer B Company, 5th of the 7th Cav

Frank Lambert – Formerly Commanding Officer D Company, 5th of the 7th Cav

Bob Trimble – Formerly XO of B Company, 5th of the 7th Cav

Robert Child – Formerly Forward Artillery Observer Bravo Company, 5th of the 7th

 

Page 213-217

March 2, 1968  - reassigned as Co D XO then as Assistant S-2.  Celebrates 21st birthday at Camp Evans and participates in relief of Khe Sanh.  Abraham is a member of Battalion staff when they come across enemy bunker with 5 enemy inside.  Abraham writes that the senior officers do not know what to do – so Abraham and two other Lt’s assault the bunker killing the enemy. 

Records obtained under the Freedom of Information Act indicate that Abraham was reassigned as S-2 Headquarters and Headquarters Company 5th Battalion, 7th Cavalry Regiment on March 10, 1968 23.  On April 1, 1968 the 3d Brigade initiated a massive air assault 5 miles east of Khe Sanh to relieve the USMC defenders.  Commanding Officer of the 5th Battalion at that time was Lt Colonel James Vaught (subsequently Lt General) 24.  Vaught was a combat veteran of the Korean War. 

From the recollection of Charlie Baker

In March we operated from Cp Evans, then LZ Long and LZ Cathy, performing search operations in the mountains west of Cp Evans.  A very quiet period.  Only 2 KIA in all of March – Sgt Strickland of C Co, and 1Lt Bruce of D Co.  By that time the senior officers of the battalion had participated on the ground in battalion maneuvers throughout Feb and knew all about what to do.  LTC Vaught was the CO, and he knew more about combat than anyone I have ever served with.  From March until April 19th, there were no incidents of members of the Battalion HQs coming across any bunkers. 

Page 218

April 1968 – Battalion goes into AShau losing 8 Hueys, 4 Chinooks and 1 crane in the assault. 

After action reports indicate that on April 19. 1068, Company B, 227th Helicopter Assault Battalion went into the A Shau with troopers from the 1st Cavalry Division.  Despite 209 Air Sorties and 21 B-52 strikes – enemy resistance was so great that 25 1st Cavalry aircraft were damaged by 50 caliber and 37mm anti aircraft fire 24. 

Page 220

Mid May 1968 – Camp Evans is hit by rocket fire, which hits ammo dump.

 On May 19/20, 1968 the ammo dump at Camp Evans was hit by NVA rockets 25 

Page 222

Early June 1968 – transferred to Brigade writing intel summaries . 

Records obtained under the Freedom of Information Act show that Abraham was reassigned as Asst S-2, 3d Brigade, 1st Cavalry on June 10, 1968 26

 

Page 225

August 6, 1968 – aboard “C-147” described as a twin turbo from An Khe to Bien Hoa.  Aircraft is hit by ground fire and port engine catches fire.  Aircraft is landed wheels up in rice paddy – no casualties.   Resumes journey to Conus.

Records obtained under the Freedom of Information Act show that Abraham was “casual enroute to CONUS” (enroute to the U.S., not assigned to a unit) on August 4, 1968 26.  A search of the Aviation Safety Network database does not indicate any aircraft shoot downs or accidents in Vietnam during the first part of August 1968 (the database does however show other aircraft incidents in Vietnam) 27.  The United States never operated any aircraft designated C-147. 

Page 228- 229

Reports seeing some men who are taking AK-47 home as war souvenirs.  Abraham also says that while enroute home, and aboard an aircraft from O Hare  “ one of the engines mounted on the tail implodes into the cabin only a few feet behind where I'm sitting. ... One of the hostesses is giving emergency first aid to a man covered in blood."  Abraham reports that there is general panic on the aircraft and that he and four other GI’s take charge immobilizing a hysterical passenger. 

Although it is entirely possible that Abraham did observe personnel who were in possession of AK-47’s as he reports, such possession was in direct violation of USARV and MACV regulations.  The importation of machine guns was a violation of the criminal statutes of the United States and personnel in Vietnam were prohibited from taking fully automatic firearms as “war trophies”.    As a Commissioned Officer, Abraham most certainly would have had a duty to report this alleged violation.   

There is one incident in the National Transportation Safety Board database relating to an aircraft incident involving an engine on August 7, 1968.  That incident involved a Trans World Airlines Convair 880 (Coronado), which experienced an engine fire on take off and returned to O’Hare.  There is no indication that any passengers were injured.  The 880 had four engines mounted under the wings like the Boeing 707 or DC-8 – not on the tail of the aircraft 28.

 Page 230/231

Referring to his return from Vietnam, Abraham states “It doesn’t take me long to detect that my parents are a little wary of me.  Everything’s just a little bit more low-key than I expected.  I find out later that they’ve received a letter from the Department of the Army which has scared them.  It warns families that returning veterans must be treated carefully:  don’t argue with them, don’t make any sudden moves, and avoid any loud bangs”

 The United States of America never sent out letters to the families of Vietnam Veterans as described by Abraham. 

 What Abraham is undoubtedly referring to, is a “joke letter” which circulated throughout the troops in Vietnam during the war.  This letter was initially penned by an unknown GI humorist, and subsequently amended and improved on by others.  The letter purported to come from the United States Army and was addressed to the relatives of the returning GI. 

It went something like this:

“Dear Mr or Mrs --------:  Shortly your son/husband etc will be returning to the United States following a one year absence.  It will take him some time to reacquaint himself with life in the United States.  The following are a few tips to ensure that his transition to civilian life will be easy.

Do not make any sudden loud noises

Ignore him if he spends hours in the bathroom flushing the toilet

Disregard his table manners and language when he asks you to “pass the f***ing salt”(expletives deleted)

 Subsequent statements/interviews by Thomas Abraham

In a Daily Telegraph story titled “Vietnam veteran's torture tale 'the work of a phoney'
By Richard Alleyne November 21, 2002 – Abraham is quoted as saying  "I can only assume they are so embarrassed by allowing someone British into their army and at their poor record keeping that they are now trying to cover it up. "I started out by being hurt by what they said. Now I am angry. To say I am doing it for money is outrageous. It was not my idea to write the book. I was approached by my agent. I fought in the war because I felt at the time America was my adopted country. I felt it was my duty when I had every right to say I'm British I don't want to fight. "But for them to do this to me is just a kick in the teeth." 29

Had he wished – Abraham was eligible as a veteran for the benefits provided under the Vietnam Era GI Bill 30.  He would have been eligible for education benefits, medical benefits, and mortgage guarantees to name a few.  Although the education benefits provided for under the bill have expired – he still is eligible for a number of other benefits 31.  Far from being “embarrassed” the United States of America treats it’s native and foreign born veterans equally and generously.  It should be noted that the National Archives Records Administration maintains a listing of the Home of Record of all those who gave their lives for the United States during the Vietnam War.  That listing includes the names of 124 persons who listed their Home of Record as being outside of the United States see32

Two Englishmen in Vietnam – A Contrast

Unlike Thomas Francis Abraham, Cyril (Rick) Rescorla33 had no need to embellish his service in the United States Army he was the real deal. 

Born in England in 1939, Rescorla enlisted in the U.S. Army in 1963.  After basic training he attended OCS and airborne training, and was assigned as a platoon leader in the 2nd Battalion, 7th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division. The very same regiment which Abraham was to join two years later.

Sent to Vietnam, he was a hero of the 1965 Ia Drang Valley battles described in the book “We Were Soldiers Once...And Young” Co-author, Lt. Gen. Hal Moore described Rescorla as being “the best platoon leader I ever saw”. Rescorla’s men nicknamed him “Hard Core” for his bravery in battle, and revered him for his good humor and compassion towards his men.

After Vietnam, Rescorla became a U.S. Citizen, earned college and law degrees, married and raised a family.  He continued to serve in the Army Reserve, retiring in 1990 as a Colonel.  In 1985, he began work for investment giant Morgan Stanley as Corporate Security Manager.

When Islamic terrorists bombed the World Trade Center in 1993, Rescorla was instrumental in evacuating the building.  He was literally the last man out.  He did research and warned authorities that he expected another attack, but was ignored.   At his insistence, all employees practiced quarterly emergency evacuations.

On September 11, 2001 American Airlines Flight 11 hit World Trade Center Tower 1 at 8:48 a.m. Rescorla ignored officials foolish advice to stay put and began the orderly evacuation of Morgan Stanley’s 2,800 employees on 20 floors of WTC 2, and 1,000 employees in WTC 5.  Rescorla reminded everyone to be proud to be an American, and sang God Bless America and other songs over his bullhorn to help evacuees stay calm as they left the building.  Rescorla had most of Morgan Stanley’s 3800 employees as well as people working on other floors of WTC 2 safely out of the buildings by the time United Airlines Flight 175 hit WTC 2 at 9:07.

After having reached safety, Rescorla returned to the building to rescue others still inside.  He was last seen heading up the stairs of the tenth floor of the collapsing WTC 2.

LISTING OF EXHIBITS

 

Exhibit 1 – Service Records of Thomas Francis Abraham obtained under FOIA

Exhibit 2 – Letter by Ltc Bowman (retired) – to the Times

Exhibit 3 – The Battle at LZ Colt – General John A. Wickham

Exhibit 4 – Listing of Commanding Officers of the 5th Battalion, 7th Cavalry Regiment

Exhibit 5 - Notes from NARA search of 5th Battalion, 7th Cavalry Daily Journals,   November 29, 2002 – Jay Veith

 Exhibit 6 - NTSB incident report re-Convair 880 –August 1968

 Exhibit 7 – Battalion Daily Journal

 Exhibit 8 - email dated 11/24/02 from Jay Veith to Bud Williams, RE: Tom Abraham

 Exhibit 9 – Listing of 5th of 7th personnel Killed in Action as referenced by Charlie  Baker and Bob Trimble

Exhibit 10 – Medal of Honor Citation- James Sprayberry

 

WITNESS LIST

 

Howard Prince, Brigadier General. USA Ret – Formerly Commanding Officer Bravo Company, 5th of the 7th Cav

 Charles R. Baker, Colonel. USA Ret. - Assigned to 3d Bde Hqs from July 1967 through 11 Jan. 1968.  From Jan. 12, 1968 through June 23, 1968 was the Battalion Operations Officer.  Colonel Baker is working on a book of his own about the period, and has done extensive research.  Colonel Baker has the journals for the period, extensive notes he had taken in Vietnam, and a sharp memory of all the major actions.

 Don Bowman, Lieutenant Colonel. USA Ret – Formerly Brigade S-3 – 3d Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division

 Bob Trimble – Formerly Executive Officer of Bravo Company, 5th of the 7th Cav

 Robert Child – Formerly Forward Artillery Observer Bravo Company, 5th of the 7th Cav B Co., 5/7 Cav, from 8 SEP 67 to 7 SEP 68

 Frank Lambert – Formerly Commanding Officer Delta Company, 5th of the 7th Cav      
 Jay Veith - Author of "Codename" BRIGHT LIGHT," an excellet study of US efforts to locate American prisoners during the Vietnam War.    

 

Exhibits

       

Exhibit 1-A

 

 

Exhibit 1-B

 

                                                                               Exhibit 1-C

 

 

 Exhibit 1-D

 

Exhibit 1-E

 

 Exhibit 2

 Don Bowmans letter to The Times – November 20, 2002

Dear Sir,

I was the operations officer of the Third Brigade, First Cavalry Division during the period of the activities described in Mr Abraham's book. I have refreshed my memory by consulting my diary and by contacting the operations officer of Mr. Abraham's battalion, the Fifth Battalion Seventh Cavalry. I can state emphatically  that the rescue attempt to save the downed pilot and the story of his capture by Viet Cong, escape and return to friendly control are fiction. They did not happen to Mr. Abraham or to any one else in our brigade.

He did serve in our brigade and shortly before my own departure from Vietnam at the end of my tour of duty he was moved from his battalion up to serve in the brigade headquarters as an assistant staff officer. Prior to Tet he served in some very heavy fighting in the Que Son Valley. I am at a loss to explain why he takes no pride in his real and honorable service and chooses to fabricate a tale so easily exposed as a fake.

Many of us saw heavy combat in that period during Vietnam. All of us were affected by it as have been veterans of all wars. The images, sounds and smells of those events remain with us all of our lives. That does not mean that we are slaves to them or controlled by them in any way. If Mr. Abraham's life went sour thirty years after his service it has little if anything to do with Vietnam. His fabrications have everything to do with the cottage industry of those who seek to be excused and rewarded for anti-social behavior because of some distant trauma. If Mr. Abraham is a talented writer and can sell his tale as fiction and earn back the colossal advances paid him by his publishers, more power to him. But, if the publishers knowingly palm off on the public a story that is demonstrably false, shame on them.

I am prepared to back up my assertions as to the fictional character of the tale of his capture, imprisonment and escape with a list of witnesses who have first hand knowledge of this case.

Donald C. Bowman
LTC, US Army, Retired
2740 Lynda Lane
Columbus, Georgia 31906
USA
706-569-0700

Exhibit 3

The Battle at LZ Colt*

(October 10, 1967)

My recollection is that we air assaulted into LZ Colt on the 7th of October, though it could have been a day earlier.

The firebase location was not my choice because I always tried to occupy high ground which could be defended. Colt was no more than a small terrain rise amid paddy fields, and the sparse population around the base was very hostile--it was VC country.

We could see with field glasses small groups moving in and out of surrounding jungle areas and I thought we would be in for trouble. In the middle of the terrain rise was a large pile of rocks where we ultimately made our tactical command post and located the artillery battery.

The brigade obliged us to choose the firebase location, despite my objection, because it allowed intersection of supporting artillery. As the Cav moved into new locations the firebases always had to be under the umbrella of supporting artillery. And my four rifle companies deployed in search and destroy operations outside of Colt always remained under cover of the artillery battery of 6 105mm howitzers inside the perimeter.

Our perimeter consisted of one rifle company (the Cav battalions had five rifle companies plus headquarters and supply companies). Overall we had roughly 250 men inside the perimeter. My tactical command post was very small, perhaps 20 people at most.

The headquarters and supply companies remained in a rear area, called brigade trains. Major George Moore, an outstanding officer whom I admired greatly, was my head of operations and his assistant was Lt. Pinchot. Lt. Pinchot I believe handled air support operations, though as an assistant to Moore he would be able to undertake a variety of planning activities.

On 8 October the Division commander, Major General Jack Tolson, visited my battalion. After inspecting our situation I told him that we had run out of concertina wire--we were able to deploy only one roll around the perimeter instead of the usual three rolls (one on top of two).

We also had run out of trip flares and claymore mines. General Tolson was disturbed about this (wondering out loud why the brigade had not helped with this problem) and told me he would have more wire and munitions immediately sent out the next day by CH47 helicopter.

Unfortunately the next day we were inundated by monsoon rain and no aircraft could fly. Foxholes filled almost to the brim with water.

The battalion surgeon was called to the perimeter during the rain to attend to a Vietnamese woman and baby who appeared to be wounded or injured, and begged for help. The surgeon ignored my standing orders not to allow anyone inside the perimeter and took the injured child to a location near the pile of rocks and then inside my tent because of the downpour.

I was not there at the time.

After treating the child and woman, they were escorted out of the perimeter.

On the 10th of October, around 0300 hours, the firebase was infiltrated by North Vietnamese regulars wearing Cav uniforms--they may have come through the wire, or through tunnels.

We later found on one of the bodies a crudely drawn map showing in detail just where the battalion operations center was, where my tent was, and where the sleeping tents were around the ops center. The map must have come from a debrief of the Vietnamese woman and injured child.

The infiltrating sappers aimed precisely for the operations center and particularly my tent. A hand or rifle grenade was thrown into my tent instantly killing Major Moore who was next to me, and seriously wounding me.

As Cav soldiers and officers rushed out of their sleeping tents and the operations center to respond to the attack, the infiltrators fired at them point blank or threw grenades at them.

Lt Pinchot was one of the men killed and he died instantly as did all the others. After being wounded in my tent I rolled out into a foxhole and a North Vietnamese fired three bursts of AK-47 into me. Convinced life was over, I said the Lord's Prayer, and asked God simply for strength to save my battalion through the night, and that my family be taken care of after death.

Suddenly a strange sense of relief came over me, I felt no pain, no fainting, no more terror.

A medic crawled to the foxhole amid much weapons firing but I sent him off to take care of other wounded first. He later told me in the hospital that he thought I was near death in the foxhole. I knew that he had killed one of the sappers.

I managed to obtain a radio and immediately called in defensive artillery fires all around the perimeter which I had planned carefully the day we air assaulted into Colt.

The Brigade commander soon was in a helicopter above LZ Colt--he knew that I had called in artillery fires and he asked how seriously wounded I was. When I told him he said he was going to land immediately and take command even though it was pitch dark. I urged him not to do this because I was fully conscious and still able to control events--besides landing surely would hazard the helicopter and crew due to incoming small arms fire and mortars which the North Vietnamese were focusing intensely on the firebase. He did not land.

The defensive fires continued throughout the night and prevented a North Vietnamese regular battalion from overrunning the firebase.

Their plan had been for the sappers to kill the Cav battalion's leadership and then to overrun in the early dawn. However, we saved the battalion although I recollect 7 of us were killed and more than a dozen were wounded. But 13 North Vietnamese soldiers were killed inside the perimeter as a result of our firefights.

At about 0630 hours medevac helicopters landed on Colt although they took small arms fire on the approach. Wounded were taken out and evacuated to the brigade aid station. I was dragged out of my foxhole and put on the helicopters with other wounded.

The brigade chaplain gave me last rites at the aid station because the doctors believed my wounds were so severe that I might not make it. As I was being evacuated the Brigade executive officer, another lieutenant colonel, came in to take command.

The situation on LZ Colt was confused with many casualties. I recollect that several soldiers were recommended for awards though I was not in a position to initiate any myself due to serious wounds. I was recommended for the Distinguished Service Cross to MACV Headquarters but the award apparently did not have sufficient supporting statements from Brigade, perhaps due to the confusion and injuries who could have made them, so that the award came back to the Division for downgrade to Silver Star (oak leaf cluster). As soon as I was able I wrote to the wives or mothers of those killed on LZ Colt.

For further information on this battle you can refer to the Army history book: Taking the Offensive October 1966-October 1967 by Col George L MacGarrigle, published by the Army Center of Military History. It is for sale by the Government Printing Office. Pages 275-78 of this book cover the details unearthed by Col MacGarrigle in his research. Unfortunately there are some inaccuracies about this event. The author never bothered to interview me although at the time he was writing and interviewing various folks in Washington. I was available as Army Chief of Staff. I could have given him accurate information.

* Edited from General Wickham’s April/May 2001 correspondence with the family of Lt. Pinchot. Published with the permission of General Wickham.

Exhibit 4

 Commanding Officers of 5th Battalion, 7th Cavalry Regiment

  

        June 1967 to October 1967

John A. Wickham, Jr.

        October 1967 to January 1968

Herlihy T. Long (KIA)

        January 1968 to April 1968

James Vaught

        April 1968 to October 1968

Thomas W. Stockton (D. 1/31/87)

  

 Exhibit 5

Notes from NARA search of 5th Battalion, 7th Cavalry Daily Journals

November 29, 2002 – Jay Veith

 

1 Feb: 5/7 involved in "Operation Jeb Stewart" (also spelled Stuart later).
Co B is securing LZ Jack. 

4 Feb: B Co OPCON to 1/7 Cav for mission.

12 Feb: 5/7 BN attacked village of Thon Que Che at grid YD 687253.  D Co
took 5 MIAs "believed to be killed."  Log, which had listed 0 MIAs at this
point for month of Feb., not starts showing 5. 

21 Feb:  B Co CO wounded, S-3 Major Baker assumes command.  No mention of
how long.  On same day, B Co finds 5 MIAs, presumably dead, since the next
day the Graves Registration folks arrive. Log simply says 5 MIAs found.  Log
shows MIAs back to 0.  Please see attachment for this Op. Summary.  Para 5
(C) shows casualty stats.

22 Feb:  5/7th moves toward Hue, has heavy contact at YD 723246, C Co
initially reports 3 MIAs.  Log shows 3 MIAs.

23 Feb: Log drops to 1 MIA.  Not clear why, I believe initial C Co report
was confusing.

24 Feb: C Co at 1855 recovered 1 MIA from 22 Feb.

Exhibit 6

 From the NTSB website at http://www.ntsb.gov/ntsb/query.asp

Search covered period August 1, 1968 through August 31, 1968

Event occurred Wednesday, August 07, 1968 at CHICAGO, IL
Aircraft:CONVAIR 880, registration: N828TW

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 FILE    DATE          LOCATION          AIRCRAFT DATA       INJURIES       FLIGHT                        PILOT DATA

                                                               F  S M/N     PURPOSE

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

4-0013   68/8/7    CHICAGO,ILL         CONVAIR 880         CR-  0  0  7  SCHED DOM PASSG SRV       CERTIFICATE UNKNOWN, AGE

        TIME - 0737                    N828TW              PX-  0  0 37                            UNK/NR, UNK/NR TOTAL

                                       DAMAGE-MINOR        OT-  0  0  0                            HOURS, UNK/NR IN TYPE,

                                                                                                   UNK/NR INSTRUMENT RATED.

        CLASSIFIED AS INCIDENT

        NAME OF AIRPORT - OHARE

        OPERATOR - TRANS WORLD AIRLINES,INC.

        TYPE OF ACCIDENT                                         PHASE OF OPERATION

           ENGINE FAILURE OR MALFUNCTION                            TAKEOFF: INITIAL CLIMB

           FIRE OR EXPLOSION: IN FLIGHT                             TAKEOFF: INITIAL CLIMB

        COMPLETE POWER LOSS - COMPLETE ENGINE FAILURE/FLAMEOUT-1 ENGINE

        EMERGENCY CIRCUMSTANCES - PRECAUTIONARY LANDING ON AIRPORT

                                  SUSPECTED MECHANICAL DISCREPANCY

        REMARKS- 14TH STAGE DISC,NO.4 ENG,FAILED. ENG CAUGHT FIRE. PLT LANDED SAFELY. ENG COWL DAMAGED.      

  Exhibit 7



Exhibit 8

 From an email dated 11/24/02 to Bud Williams, RE: Tom Abraham.

Bud,

One other point.  I reviewed all the JPRC Weekly Bright Light reports for Jan-May 1968 for recovery's, escapes, etc., in the general I Corps area.  I cast a wide net to make sure.   Here are the results:

22 Jan 68 - Marines LCPL Steven Nelson and PFC Michael Roha, reported missing on 7 Jan 68, returned to US control at Da Nang on 22 Jan after allegedly escaping when their NVA guard fell asleep.

23 Jan 68 - Two U.S. PWs released about 15 kms west of Tam Ky, Jose Agosto-Santos and Luis Ortiz Rivera.   Well-known incident.

6 Feb 69 - Two French Catholic priests, Father's Pelzcher and De Evaliz, were released by NVA units after their capture in Hue.  There was also a well-known group of US civilians and MI personnel captured in Hue at this time.

Because of the Tet offensive, Col. Reisner, head of the JPRC, notes in the Weekly report for 6-12 Feb 1968 that "Normal channels which provide information to JPRC concerning missing or captured U.S. personnel have been disrupted because of VC Tet offensive.  Some of the missing personnel are MI men and their indigenous agents who normally supply information to JPRC.  Actions to alleviate this intelligence gap are:  (A) An increase in the reward leaflet program program to South Vietnam.  (B) Requirements to tactical intelligence units for increasing surveillance and reporting of sightings and movements of VC with PWs.  (C) Dispatch of JPRC reps to Danang-Hue [this was LTC Charlie Ogle, whom I interviewed and who never mentioned any incident that Abraham describes, and he was in the area for most of Feb.] to track down leads on missing personnel.  If PWs are located, Field rep will coordinate immediate recovery efforts using local available forces and MACSOG assets.  PRU units were also alerted to be on watch.  What this means is that when Tet hit, Col. Reisner sent his deputy to Hue to coordinate any recovery efforts, and all units were alerted to heighten their reporting procedures about US PWs. 

 13 Feb 68 - Marine William Taliferro released by communists. The JPRC reports do not mention him.  I no longer have my files, having given them to Texas Tech, but I seem to recall picking his name off the DPMO list and then finding this info in the Library of Congress files (which are USG files).  So I guess it is possible for someone to slip through the cracks.   However, my memory is vague and I could be wrong, so someone would have to do further research on this guy to figure it out.

23 Feb 68 - Two of the MI guys from Hue, Hayhurst and Durhling, escape from the group of Hue detainees.    This is a well-known incident and all these people have long been id'ed.  

28 March - an RF soldier escaped from a PW camp in the vicinity of ZC 1948.  He claimed two US PWs were in the camp and offered to lead a recovery force back in.  JPRC prepared to raid the camp with SOG assets, but then discovered that on 29 March, a Marine patrol had traversed this area and found an abandoned bivouac site at the suspected location.  It was searched thoroughly, and nothing of interest was found and the operation was terminated.

 And that's it.

Jay

 Exhibit 9

http://www.no-quarter.org/cgi-bin/details.cgi?IDNO=O5331954      

General / Personal ---

Last name: SIME
First name: ROBERT JOY
Home of Record (official): TOLNA
State (official): ND
Date of Birth: Sunday, December 10, 1939
Sex: Male
Race: Caucasian
Marital Status: Married

--- Military ---

Branch: Army
Rank: 1LT
Serial Number: O5331954
Component: Reserve
Pay grade: O2
MOS (Military Occupational Specialty code): 1542

--- Action ---

Start of Tour: Thursday, March 30, 1967
Date of Casualty: Monday, October 23, 1967
Age at time of loss: 27
Casualty type: (A1) Hostile, died
Reason: Gun, small arms fire (Ground casualty)
Country: South VietNam
Province: Quang Tin
The Wall: Panel 28E - Row 057

http://www.no-quarter.org/cgi-bin/details.cgi?IDNO=55891602      

--- General / Personal ---

Last name: GISH
First name: JAMES EDWARD
Home of Record (official): TERRE HAUTE
State (official): IN
Date of Birth: Friday, November 29, 1946
Sex: Male
Race: Caucasian
Marital Status: Married

--- Military ---

Branch: Army
Rank: CPL
Serial Number: 55891602
Component: Selective Service
Posthumous promotion as indicated
Pay grade: E3
MOS (Military Occupational Specialty code): Unknown/Not reported
Major Organization: 1st Cavalry Div

--- Action ---

Start of Tour: Thursday, May 25, 1967
Date of Casualty: Wednesday, October 25, 1967
Age at time of loss: 20
Casualty type: (C1) Non-hostile, died of other causes
Reason: Accidental self destruction (Ground casualty)
Country: South VietNam
Province: Quang Tin
The Wall: Panel 28E - Row 066

 http://www.no-quarter.org/cgi-bin/details.cgi?IDNO=29043403      

--- General / Personal ---

Last name: PEREZ
First name: WILFRED M
Home of Record (official): NEW YORK
State (official): NY
Date of Birth: Monday, April 27, 1925
Sex: Male
Race: Caucasian
Marital Status: Married

--- Military ---

Branch: Army
Rank: SFC
Serial Number: 29043403
Component: Regular
Posthumous promotion as indicated
Pay grade: E6
MOS (Military Occupational Specialty code): 11D40
Major Organization: 1st Cavalry Div

--- Action ---

Start of Tour: Saturday, June 17, 1967
Date of Casualty: Sunday, September 17, 1967
Age at time of loss: 42
Casualty type: (A1) Hostile, died
Reason: Gun, small arms fire (Ground casualty)
Country: South VietNam
Province: Binh Dinh
The Wall: Panel 26E - Row 086
   

http://www.no-quarter.org/cgi-bin/details.cgi?IDNO=52679929        

Last name: PAUL
First name: CLYDE EVERTTE JR
Home of Record (official): TILFORD
State (official): KY
Date of Birth: Sunday, September 29, 1946
Sex: Male
Race: Caucasian
Marital Status: Single

--- Military ---

Branch: Army
Rank: SGT
Serial Number: 52679929
Component: Selective Service
Posthumous promotion as indicated
Pay grade: E4
MOS (Military Occupational Specialty code): 11B20
Major Organization: 1st Cavalry Div

--- Action ---

Start of Tour: Thursday, October 27, 1966
Date of Casualty: Sunday, September 17, 1967
Age at time of loss: 20
Casualty type: (A1) Hostile, died
Reason: Gun, small arms fire (Ground casualty)
Country: South VietNam
Province: Binh Dinh
The Wall: Panel 26E - Row 085
   

http://www.no-quarter.org/cgi-bin/details.cgi?IDNO=54404309      
 --- General / Personal ---     

Last name: GUTIERREZ
First name: RAUL GRIMALDO
Home of Record (official): BROWNFIELD
State (official): TX
Date of Birth: Saturday, November 22, 1947
Sex: Male
Race: Caucasian
Marital Status: Single

--- Military ---

Branch: Army
Rank: PFC
Serial Number: 54404309
Component: Selective Service
Pay grade: E3
MOS (Military Occupational Specialty code): 11B10
Major Organization: 1st Cavalry Div

--- Action ---

Start of Tour: Tuesday, October 24, 1967
Date of Casualty: Sunday, January 7, 1968
Age at time of loss: 20
Casualty type: (A3) Hostile, died while missing
Reason: Multiple fragmentation wounds (Ground casualty)
Country: South VietNam
Province: Quang Nam
The Wall: Panel 33E - Row 068

http://www.no-quarter.org/cgi-bin/details.cgi?IDNO=16272811      

--- General / Personal ---

Last name: SOLOMON
First name: WILFRED L SR
Home of Record (official): OMAHA
State (official): NE
Date of Birth: Sunday, August 7, 1932
Sex: Male
Race: Caucasian
Marital Status: Married

--- Military ---

Branch: Army
Rank: SFC
Serial Number: 16272811
Component: Regular
Pay grade: E7
MOS (Military Occupational Specialty code): 11B40
Major Organization: 1st Cavalry Div

--- Action ---

Start of Tour: Wednesday, October 25, 1967
Date of Casualty: Thursday, February 8, 1968
Age at time of loss: 35
Casualty type: (A1) Hostile, died
Reason: Gun, small arms fire (Ground casualty)
Country: South VietNam
Province: Thua Thien
The Wall: Panel 38E - Row 038

 http://www.no-quarter.org/cgi-bin/details.cgi?IDNO=15807222      
 --- General / Personal ---     

Last name: JUMPER
First name: STEPHEN FRANKLIN
Home of Record (official): DALLAS
State (official): TX
Date of Birth: Monday, February 7, 1949
Sex: Male
Race: Caucasian
Marital Status: Single

--- Military ---

Branch: Army
Rank: PFC
Serial Number: 15807222
Component: Regular
Pay grade: E3
MOS (Military Occupational Specialty code): 11B10
Major Organization: 1st Cavalry Div

--- Action ---

Start of Tour: Wednesday, September 20, 1967
Date of Casualty: Monday, November 6, 1967
Age at time of loss: 18
Casualty type: (A1) Hostile, died
Reason: Gun, small arms fire (Ground casualty)
Country: South VietNam
Province: Quang Tin
The Wall: Panel 29E - Row 031

http://www.no-quarter.org/cgi-bin/details.cgi?IDNO=56457054      

--- General / Personal ---

Last name: LEISING
First name: BRUCE CHARLES
Home of Record (official): WAUWATOSA
State (official): WI
Date of Birth: Monday, August 26, 1946
Sex: Male
Race: Caucasian
Marital Status: Single

--- Military ---

Branch: Army
Rank: PFC
Serial Number: 56457054
Component: Selective Service
Pay grade: E3
MOS (Military Occupational Specialty code): 11B10
Major Organization: 1st Cavalry Div

--- Action ---

Start of Tour: Thursday, October 19, 1967
Date of Casualty: Monday, November 6, 1967
Age at time of loss: 21
Casualty type: (A1) Hostile, died
Reason: Gun, small arms fire (Ground casualty)
Country: South VietNam
Province: Quang Tin
The Wall: Panel 29E - Row 032

http://www.no-quarter.org/cgi-bin/details.cgi?IDNO=O69224      

--- General / Personal ---

Last name: MOORE
First name: JAMES BUCKSON
Home of Record (official): RIDLEY PARK
State (official): PA
Date of Birth: Tuesday, January 6, 1931
Sex: Male
Race: Caucasian
Marital Status: Married

--- Military ---

Branch: Army
Rank: LTC
Serial Number: O69224
Component: Regular
Posthumous promotion as indicated
Pay grade: O4
MOS (Military Occupational Specialty code): 2162

--- Action ---

Start of Tour: Friday, July 7, 1967
Date of Casualty: Tuesday, October 10, 1967
Age at time of loss: 36
Casualty type: (A3) Hostile, died while missing
Reason: Other causes (Ground casualty)
Country: South VietNam
Province: Quang Nam
The Wall: Panel 27E - Row 085

http://www.no-quarter.org/cgi-bin/details.cgi?IDNO=O5334309      
 --- General / Personal ---     

Last name: PINCHOT
First name: CRAIG D
Home of Record (official): LAKEWOOD
State (official): CA
Date of Birth: Friday, June 15, 1945
Sex: Male
Race: Caucasian
Marital Status: Single

--- Military ---

Branch: Army
Rank: 2LT
Serial Number: O5334309
Component: Reserve
Pay grade: O1
MOS (Military Occupational Specialty code): 1542

--- Action ---

Start of Tour: Thursday, May 11, 1967
Date of Casualty: Tuesday, October 10, 1967
Age at time of loss: 22
Casualty type: (A1) Hostile, died
Reason: Multiple fragmentation wounds (Ground casualty)
Country: South VietNam
Province: Quang Nam
The Wall: Panel 27E - Row 086

 http://www.no-quarter.org/cgi-bin/details.cgi?IDNO=O5325207      

--- General / Personal ---

Last name: AUBERT
First name: THOMAS CLIFFORD
Home of Record (official): LOS ANGELES
State (official): CA
Date of Birth: Wednesday, July 28, 1937
Sex: Male
Race: Caucasian
Marital Status: Married

--- Military ---

Branch: Army
Rank: CPT
Serial Number: O5325207
Component: Reserve
Pay grade: O3
MOS (Military Occupational Specialty code): 1542

--- Action ---

Start of Tour: Saturday, February 4, 1967
Date of Casualty: Tuesday, October 10, 1967
Age at time of loss: 30
Casualty type: (A1) Hostile, died
Reason: Gun, small arms fire (Ground casualty)
Country: South VietNam
Province: Quang Nam
The Wall: Panel 27E - Row 083

http://www.no-quarter.org/cgi-bin/details.cgi?IDNO=53810676      

--- General / Personal ---

Last name: DAVIS
First name: JOHN EDWARD
Home of Record (official): COTTAGE GROVE
State (official): TN
Date of Birth: Wednesday, January 2, 1946
Sex: Male
Race: Caucasian
Marital Status: Single

--- Military ---

Branch: Army
Rank: SP4
Serial Number: 53810676
Component: Selective Service
Pay grade: E4
MOS (Military Occupational Specialty code): 71B20
Major Organization: 1st Cavalry Div

--- Action ---

Start of Tour: Tuesday, August 15, 1967
Date of Casualty: Tuesday, October 10, 1967
Age at time of loss: 21
Casualty type: (A1) Hostile, died
Reason: Multiple fragmentation wounds (Ground casualty)
Country: South VietNam
Province: Quang Nam
The Wall: Panel 27E - Row 084

http://www.no-quarter.org/cgi-bin/details.cgi?IDNO=53452491

--- General / Personal ---

Last name: BAILEY
First name: JAMES ALVIN
Home of Record (official): RYDAL
State (official): GA
Date of Birth: Wednesday, March 26, 1947
Sex: Male
Race: Caucasian
Marital Status: Single

--- Military ---

Branch: Army
Rank: CPL
Serial Number: 53452491
Component: Selective Service
Posthumous promotion as indicated
Pay grade: E3
MOS (Military Occupational Specialty code): 11B10
Major Organization: 1st Cavalry Div

--- Action ---

Start of Tour: Monday, October 23, 1967
Date of Casualty: Saturday, January 6, 1968
Age at time of loss: 20
Casualty type: (A1) Hostile, died
Reason: Multiple fragmentation wounds (Ground casualty)
Country: South VietNam
Province: Quang Nam
The Wall: Panel 33E - Row 055

http://www.no-quarter.org/cgi-bin/details.cgi?IDNO=19886919

--- General / Personal ---

Last name: BURNETTE
First name: ARCHIE JR
Home of Record (official): ABERDEEN
State (official): WA
Date of Birth: Friday, February 21, 1947
Sex: Male
Race: Caucasian
Marital Status: Married

--- Military ---

Branch: Army
Rank: SSG
Serial Number: 19886919
Component: Regular
Posthumous promotion as indicated
Pay grade: E5
MOS (Military Occupational Specialty code): 11B4D
Major Organization: 1st Cavalry Div

--- Action ---

Start of Tour: Wednesday, May 17, 1967
Date of Casualty: Wednesday, January 31, 1968
Age at time of loss: 20
Casualty type: (A3) Hostile, died while missing
Reason: Gun, small arms fire (Ground casualty)
Country: South VietNam
Province: Binh Dinh
The Wall: Panel 35E - Row 089

http://www.no-quarter.org/cgi-bin/details.cgi?IDNO=54666259

--- General / Personal ---

Last name: WHITLOCK
First name: JIMMIE DALE
Home of Record (official): HOLDENVILLE
State (official): OK
Date of Birth: Saturday, March 11, 1944
Sex: Male
Race: Caucasian
Marital Status: Married

--- Military ---

Branch: Army
Rank: PFC
Serial Number: 54666259
Component: Selective Service
Pay grade: E3
MOS (Military Occupational Specialty code): 11B10
Major Organization: 1st Cavalry Div

--- Action ---

Start of Tour: Friday, January 12, 1968
Date of Casualty: Saturday, February 24, 1968
Age at time of loss: 23
Casualty type: (A2) Hostile, died of wounds
Reason: Multiple fragmentation wounds (Ground casualty)
Country: South VietNam
Province: Thua Thien
The Wall: Panel 41E - Row 014

http://www.no-quarter.org/cgi-bin/details.cgi?IDNO=11703542

--- General / Personal ---

Last name: WILT
First name: RICHARD JAMES
Home of Record (official): HOLLAND
State (official): OH
Date of Birth: Wednesday, October 20, 1948
Sex: Male
Race: Caucasian
Marital Status: Single

--- Military ---

Branch: Army
Rank: SP4
Serial Number: 11703542
Component: Regular
Pay grade: E4
MOS (Military Occupational Specialty code): 11B20
Major Organization: 1st Cavalry Div

--- Action ---

Start of Tour: Monday, April 10, 1967
Date of Casualty: Monday, February 26, 1968
Age at time of loss: 19
Casualty type: (A2) Hostile, died of wounds
Reason: Multiple fragmentation wounds (Ground casualty)
Country: South VietNam
Province: Thua Thien
The Wall: Panel 41E - Row 046

http://www.no-quarter.org/cgi-bin/details.cgi?IDNO=67173575

--- General / Personal ---

Last name: NICK
First name: OTIS LEE
Home of Record (official): MYTON
State (official): UT
Date of Birth: Saturday, October 28, 1944
Sex: Male
Race: Caucasian
Marital Status: Single

--- Military ---

Branch: Army
Rank: PFC
Serial Number: 67173575
Component: Selective Service
Pay grade: E3
MOS (Military Occupational Specialty code): 11B10
Major Organization: 1st Cavalry Div

--- Action ---

Start of Tour: Monday, August 28, 1967
Date of Casualty: Thursday, February 29, 1968
Age at time of loss: 23
Casualty type: (A2) Hostile, died of wounds
Reason: Gun, small arms fire (Ground casualty)
Country: South VietNam
Province: Quang Nam
The Wall: Panel 42E - Row 008 

http://www.no-quarter.org/cgi-bin/details.cgi?IDNO=56700225

--- General / Personal ---

Last name: MARTIN
First name: MICHAEL EMMETT
Home of Record (official): LOS ANGELES
State (official): CA
Date of Birth: Tuesday, August 24, 1948
Sex: Male
Race: Caucasian
Marital Status: Single

--- Military ---

Branch: Army
Rank: SP4
Serial Number: 56700225
Component: Selective Service
Pay grade: E4
MOS (Military Occupational Specialty code): 11B10
Major Organization: 1st Cavalry Div

--- Action ---

Start of Tour: Monday, May 15, 1967
Date of Casualty: Thursday, February 29, 1968
Age at time of loss: 19
Casualty type: (A1) Hostile, died
Reason: Gun, small arms fire (Ground casualty)
Country: South VietNam
Province: Thua Thien
The Wall: Panel 42E - Row 007

 http://www.no-quarter.org/cgi-bin/details.cgi?IDNO=54970650

--- General / Personal ---

Last name: GROAT
First name: RICHARD JAMES
Home of Record (official): PORT HURON
State (official): MI
Date of Birth: Wednesday, December 11, 1946
Sex: Male
Race: Caucasian
Marital Status: Single

--- Military ---

Branch: Army
Rank: PFC
Serial Number: 54970650
Component: Selective Service
Pay grade: E3
MOS (Military Occupational Specialty code): 11C10
Major Organization: 1st Cavalry Div

--- Action ---

Start of Tour: Saturday, February 3, 1968
Date of Casualty: Thursday, February 29, 1968
Age at time of loss: 21
Casualty type: (A1) Hostile, died
Reason: Gun, small arms fire (Ground casualty)
Country: South VietNam
Province: Thua Thien
The Wall: Panel 42E - Row 005

http://www.no-quarter.org/cgi-bin/details.cgi?IDNO=O5338178

--- General / Personal ---

Last name: WATT
First name: WILLIAM ROY
Home of Record (official): SWEETWATER
State (official): TX
Date of Birth: Friday, January 17, 1947
Sex: Male
Race: Caucasian
Marital Status: Single

--- Military ---

Branch: Army
Rank: 1LT
Serial Number: O5338178
Component: Reserve
Pay grade: O2
MOS (Military Occupational Specialty code): 1542

--- Action ---

Start of Tour: Saturday, December 2, 1967
Date of Casualty: Thursday, February 29, 1968
Age at time of loss: 21
Casualty type: (A1) Hostile, died
Reason: Gun, small arms fire (Ground casualty)
Country: South VietNam
Province: Thua Thien
The Wall: Panel 42E - Row 012

http://www.no-quarter.org/cgi-bin/details.cgi?IDNO=53385540

--- General / Personal ---

Last name: STRICKLAND
First name: CHARLIE R JR
Home of Record (official): ROCKY MOUNT
State (official): NC
Date of Birth: Sunday, August 10, 1941
Sex: Male
Race: Caucasian
Marital Status: Single

--- Military ---

Branch: Army
Rank: SGT
Serial Number: 53385540
Component: Regular
Pay grade: E5
MOS (Military Occupational Specialty code): 11C40
Major Organization: 1st Cavalry Div

--- Action ---

Start of Tour: Saturday, August 5, 1967
Date of Casualty: Wednesday, March 6, 1968
Age at time of loss: 26
Casualty type: (A2) Hostile, died of wounds
Reason: Other explosive device (Ground casualty)
Country: South VietNam
Province: Thua Thien
The Wall: Panel 43E - Row 035

 http://www.no-quarter.org/cgi-bin/details.cgi?IDNO=O5333867

--- General / Personal ---

Last name: BRUCE
First name: RICHARD PETER
Home of Record (official): CLEVELAND
State (official): OH
Date of Birth: Friday, November 9, 1945
Sex: Male
Race: Caucasian
Marital Status: Single

--- Military ---

Branch: Army
Rank: 1LT
Serial Number: O5333867
Component: Reserve
Pay grade: O2
MOS (Military Occupational Specialty code): 1542

--- Action ---

Start of Tour: Wednesday, October 18, 1967
Date of Casualty: Tuesday, March 12, 1968
Age at time of loss: 22
Casualty type: (A1) Hostile, died
Reason: Unknown / Not reported (Ground casualty)
Country: South VietNam
Province: Thua Thien
The Wall: Panel 44E - Row 024

 

Exhibit 10

http://www.mishalov.com/Sprayberry.html

Medal of Honor

 SPRAYBERRY, JAMES M .

 Rank and organization: Captain (then 1st Lt.), U.S. Army, Company D, 5th Battalion, 7th Cavalry , 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile).

 Place and date: Republic of Vietnam, 25 April 1968.

 Entered service at: Montgomery, Ala.

 Born: 24 April 1947, LaGrange, Ga.

 Citation:

 For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty. Capt. Sprayberry, Armor, U.S. Army, distinguished himself by exceptional bravery while serving as executive officer of Company D. His company commander and a great number of the men were wounded and separated from the main body of the company. A daylight attempt to rescue them was driven back by the well entrenched enemy's heavy fire. Capt. Sprayberry then organized and led a volunteer night patrol to eliminate the intervening enemy bunkers and to relieve the surrounded element. The patrol soon began receiving enemy machinegun fire. Capt. Sprayberry quickly moved the men to protective cover and without regard for his own safety, crawled within close range of the bunker from which the fire was coming. He silenced the machinegun with a hand grenade. Identifying several l-man enemy positions nearby, Capt. Sprayberry immediately attacked them with the rest of his grenades. He crawled back for more grenades and when 2 grenades were thrown at his men from a position to the front, Capt. Sprayberry, without hesitation, again exposed himself and charged the enemy-held bunker killing its occupants with a grenade. Placing 2 men to cover his advance, he crawled forward and neutralized 3 more bunkers with grenades. Immediately thereafter, Capt. Sprayberry was surprised by an enemy soldier who charged from a concealed position. He killed the soldier with his pistol and with continuing disregard for the danger neutralized another enemy emplacement. Capt. Sprayberry then established radio contact with the isolated men, directing them toward his position. When the 2 elements made contact he organized his men into litter parties to evacuate the wounded. As the evacuation was nearing completion, he observed an enemy machinegun position which he silenced with a grenade. Capt. Sprayberry returned to the rescue party, established security, and moved to friendly lines with the wounded. This rescue operation, which lasted approximately 71/2 hours, saved the lives of many of his fellow soldiers. Capt. Sprayberry personally killed 12 enemy soldiers, eliminated 2 machineguns, and destroyed numerous enemy bunkers. Capt. Sprayberry's indomitable spirit and gallant action at great personal risk to his life are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the U.S. Army.

    FOOTNOTES

1  http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/programmes/hardtalk/2341153.stm      
2  http://www.bbc.co.uk/shropshire/culture/writestuff/2002/10/the_cage.shtml      
3  http://www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/religion/choice.shtml (link may no longer be valid)    
4  See Exhibits 1-A, 1-B, 1-C    
5  http://www.archives.gov/facilities/mo/st_louis/military_personnel_records.html      
6  See Exhibits 1-B and 1-C    
7  Exhibit 1-C    
8  http://gator.naples.net/presents/7thcav/7-cav-uc.htm      
9   Exhibit 4    
10  Exhibit 1E    
11  Vietnam Order of Battle – Shelby Stanton – Page 71 – ISBN0-89193-700-5    
12   http://pao.hood.army.mil/1stcavdiv/history/formercg.htm     
13  Exhibit 1-E    
14  Exhibit 10    
15  http://www.dtic.mil/dpmo/pmsea/pmsea_all_p_usaf.pdf  
     (report of all USAF POW and recoveries)    
16  Exhibit 7    
17  Exhibit 3 - The Battle for LZ Colt - An Account 
     by General John A. Wickham Jr  http://www.cav57.org/LZ%20Colt.htm    
18  Exhibit 1-C    
19  Department of the Army publication – Vietnam Studies – the War in
     the Northern Provinces 1966-1968 by Lieutenant General Willard Pearson   -
     http://www.army.mil/cmh-pg/books/Vietnam/northern/nprovinces-fm.htm     
20  http://www.ehistory.com/vietnam/books/1968/0193.cfm     
21   Letter from Larry Greer DPMPO Public Affairs703-602-2102.     
22  http://www.dtic.mil/dpmo/pmsea/pmsea_all_p_usa.pdf  
    (list of all missing and recovered US Army personnel)    
23  Exhibit 1-C    
24 http://www.ehistory.com/vietnam/books/airmobility/0173.cfm  
   (monograph Lt Gen John Tolson – Vietnam Studies – Air Mobility 1961-1971 Dept of the Army)    

25   http://www.masher.org/page7.html

26 Exhibit 1 - C

27 http://aviation-safety.net/database/1968/1968-acc.html

28 http://www.ntsb.gov/ntsb/query.asp

29   http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/main.jhtml?xml=/news/2002/11/21/nbook21.xml

30   http://www4.law.cornell.edu/uscode/38/index.html

31   http://www.va.gov/  

32  http://www.archives.gov/research_room/research_topics/vietnam_war_casualty_lists/state_level_index_by_town.html

33 http://www.post44.org/misc/rescorla.html