MIA Facts Site

Report of the
Senate Select Committee
on
POW-MIA Affairs:
Appendix 2e

North Vietnam William R. Tromp
(0304)

See Vessey Discrepancy Cases for case summary.



North Vietnam Lee A. Adams
(0307)

On April 19, 1966, First Lieutenant Adams was the pilot of an F-
105D, one in a flight of four on a combat mission over Quang Binh
Province. Lieutenant Adams was cleared to attack two trucks on a
road and made a strafing pass in a 25 degree dive angle as he fired
on the target. His aircraft was observed by other flight members
to crash in the area and the aircraft was completely destroyed on
impact. There was no chute or beeper and no search effort was
launched.

In June 1966, Lieutenant Adams was declared killed in action, body
not recovered. Returning U.S. POWs had no information on his
precise fate.

U.S. investigators recently in Vietnam obtained access to records
listing wartime air defense operations in Quang Binh Province. The
records of Bo Trach District recorded the reported shoot down of an
F-105 in the Nam Trach area on April 18, 1966. There were no
aircraft losses in the area on this date but this report was
believed related to another entry on April 19th where neighboring
Cu Nam militia also claimed shooting down an F-105 aircraft. These
reports were believed to correlate to this loss incident.

In November 1992, U.S. investigators obtained access to wartime
photographs relating to U.S. air operations in Vietnam. Including
in the photographs is one identified by Vietnam as a photograph of
a body identified as that of Lieutenant Adams together with
aircraft wreckage.



Laos William F. Mullen
(0323)

On April 29, 1966, an A-4E attack bomber piloted by Captain Mullen
was one in a flight of three aircraft over Khammouane Province on
a mission in the Steel Tiger mission area.

His aircraft was observed by his flight leader and another flight
airman being hit by a burst of anti-aircraft fire while in an area
of dense high cyclic rate of anti-aircraft fire which struck his
aircraft in the aft of center line. A forward air controller last
observed him 4-5 miles north of the target area flying into cloud
cover in the area of Route 9128 while continuing on a northern
heading and emitting smoke.

During one of the 26 search and rescue sorties, a search aircraft
received a strong beeper signal five nautical miles northeast of
the target area. There was no reply from search aircraft attempts
to have the source of the beeper signal respond. The signal was
then lost but one hour later started again at five minute
intervals. When the SAR force approached the ground area of the
signals, they were hit by hostile ground fire on each pass over the
area from which the signal was emanating. There were no signals in
the area on April 29th. The loss location was initially reported
as classified and in September 1973 was recorded as Laos.

Mullen was initially reported as missing in action. Returning U.S.
POWs were unable to provide any information on his precise fate.
In May 1976 he was declared dead/body not recovered, based on a
presumptive finding of death.



South Vietnam Jimmy M. Malone
(0326)

See Vessey Discrepancy Cases for case summary.



South Vietnam Bennie Lee Dexter
(0333)

See Vessey Discrepancy Cases for case summary.



Laos Lavern G. Reilly
George Jensen
Marshall L. Tapp
James A. Preston
George W. Thompson
James E. Williams
Kenneth D. McKenney
William L. Madison
(0339)

On May 15, 1966, Major Lavern Reilly was an observer on an AC-47D
aircraft, one of eight crewmen on an armed/visual reconnaissance
mission in the Steel Tiger operational area of Savannakhet
Province, Laos. It failed to return from its mission. A search
and rescue on May 16, 1966, was negative.

On June 7, 1966, a Pathet Lao radio broadcast described U.S.
aircraft shot down over Central or South Laos and included in its
list a reference to a C-47 which had been shot down on May 15 with
eight Americans killed.

None of those on the aircraft were ever reported in the northern
Vietnamese or Pathet Lao prison system. All were initially
declared mission and after the end of the war were declared
dead/body not recovered. None of their remains have been
repatriated.



Laos Ralph C. Balcom
(0340)

On May 15, 1966, Captain Balcom was the pilot of an F-105D, one in
a flight of three aircraft on an armed reconnaissance mission over
North Vietnam. The flight was unable to strike their primary
target due to cloud cover and they dropped their ordnance on Route
1A. Captain Balcom radioed after dropping his ordnance that he was
heading for home and was last seen climbing through cloud cover and
heading west in the direction of Laos. He was never seen again.
Captain Balcom was reported missing in action.

A search of the area failed to produce any evidence of either him
or his aircraft. One flight member reported hearing a beeper for
a short time but search and rescue aircraft did not hear it.


Pathet Lao radio reported downing an F-105 on May 15, 1966.
Captain Balcom's aircraft was the only F-105 loss on that date and
the Pathet Lao report was tentatively correlated to him.

Captain Balcom was initially reported lost over North Vietnam.
Returning POWs had no information on his precise fate. After
Operation Homecoming, a Joint Casualty Resolution Center
review of Captain Balcom's flight led to a correction in his
country of loss to be Laos. Part of the basis for this conclusion
was due to the Pathet Lao broadcast. In December 1977 Captain
Balcom was declared dead/body not recovered, based on a presumptive
finding of death.



South Vietnam Louis Buckley, Jr.
(0344)

See Vessey Discrepancy Cases for case summary.




North Vietnam Martin W. Steen
(0349)

On May 31, 1966, Captain Steen was the pilot of an F-105D, one in
a flight of four aircraft on an armed reconnaissance mission over
Van Chan District, Nghia Lo Province. He radioed he'd been hit by
hostile fire while over the target, was unable to control his
aircraft and was going to eject. Other flight members observed his
canopy separate, saw him eject, there was a good chute, and he
apparently landed in mountainous terrain along a 3000 foot ridge
line.

Search and rescue forces were alerted and a pararescue specialist
lowered to the area where Captain Steen's aircraft had touched
down, found it snagged in the trees with the harness approximately
30 feet off the ground, with no trace of Captain Steen, and with
the pararescue specialist unable to determine if the parachute
reached the ground. Captain Steen was declared missing in action.


In December 1969, a People's Army of Vietnam soldier reported a
U.S. pilot had been captured near Highway 6 in Son La Province and
the soldier had escorted the pilot to Son La City. This report
related to an incident which occurred in a neighboring province but
was thought to possibly correlate to Steen for reasons which are
unclear.

In February 1973, a returning U.S. POW described how, after his own
capture, he'd been shown an ejection sheet and a sketch of a pilot
with the name "Pheebee" followed by a five digit number. The
Vietnamese captor indicated through sign language the pilot had
been killed on impact. Since the eyes in the drawing were open,
the returnee speculated the individual might be alive and the
picture resembled Captain Steen.

No returning POWs had any information on Captain Steen's precise
fate. In January 1974 he was declared dead/body not recovered,
based on a presumptive finding of death.

In December 1983, Vietnamese officials returned the military
identity card of Captain Steen. Later, a next of kin became aware
that a pistol and watch was available for purchase through private
channels and these were believed to have belonged to Captain Steen.

In December 1990, a joint U.S./Vietnamese team visited Yen Bai Town
and gained access to a Nghia Lo Province document which criticized
local militia for not capturing the pilot of a downed aircraft.
The location and date of the incident correlated to the loss
incident of Captain Steen. Investigators interviewed witnesses who
stated that two aircraft were downed on May 31st over Van Chan
District and described one incident which correlated to the loss of
Captain Steen. The witnesses stated that the pilot had died on May
31, 1966, but it was not until four days later that they found a
decomposing body which was covered up with a parachute. The body
was buried in a remote forested area and the remains were later
consumed by animals.



Laos Theodore E. Kryszak
Russell D. Martin
Harding E. Smith
Harold E. Mullins
Ervin Warren
Luther L. Rose
(0354)

On June 19, 1968, an AC-47 aircraft departed Ubon Air Base,
Thailand, on an armed reconnaissance mission over South Laos. At
2125 hours the crew reported their aircraft was on fire and a fire
could be seen in the right wing root. Fire soon engulfed the
entire right side of the aircraft and burning pieces began to fall
away from it. The order was given to bail out and that was the
last transmission from the aircraft's crew.

The aircraft, still on fire, continued in a straight level flight
for approximately 5-10 seconds before turning nose over and
crashing in a high angle dive, impacting 30 miles northeast of
Tchepone. There was no hostile ground fire observed at the time.
There were no parachutes observed and no emergency beepers. An
airborne search and rescue force located the tail assembly of the
aircraft but no evidence of the crew or that any survived. The
crew was declared missing in action.

On September 13, 1968, the Pathet Lao news service reporting that
Harding Eugene Smith was shot down on June 3, 1968 when his
aircraft was bombing a Pathet Lao controller area of Laos.

The crew was not accounted for by the Pathet Lao during Operation
Homecoming and returning U.S. POWs has no knowledge of their
eventual fate. The crew members were declared dead/body not
recovered, based on a presumptive finding of death on separate
dates between June 1974 and January 1979.



Laos Warren P. Smith
(0370)

On June 22, 1966, Captain Smith was the pilot of an 01F when his
aircraft was hit by heavy automatic weapons fire. He radioed his
wingman, another 01F, that his aircraft was on fire. His wingman
observed him land in what appeared to be a controlled landing at a
point 45 kilometers northwest of Tchepone and south of Route 911 in
Savannakhet Province, Laos. His wingman overflew the crash site
and later recounted he saw Captain Smith slumped in the cockpit.
Captain Smith did not respond to repeated calls on the radio. One
hour later search and rescue forces arrived and determined that
Captain Smith was no longer in the aircraft. The SAR mission was
discontinued due to heavy enemy small arms fire from the area.

Captain Smith was initially declared missing. He was not reported
alive in the northern Vietnamese prison system and his remains have
not been repatriated. In January 1974 he was declared dead/body
not recovered.



South Vietnam William Ellis, Jr.
(0372)

See Vessey Discrepancy Cases for case summary.



Over water Charles W. Marik
(0374)

On June 25, 1966, Lieutenant JG Marik and Lieutenant Commander
Richard M. Weber, pilot, were the crew of an A-6A from the U.S.S.
Constellation on a combat mission against the Hoi Thuong Barracks,
a coastal target in northern Vietnam. Their aircraft was hit by
anti-aircraft fire in the tail section during a bombing run on the
target and the pilot found the aircraft was not responding to
control. Both crewmen bailed out and the pilot was in contact with
Lieutenant Marik while descending but did not observe him actually
land in the water. The pilot landed in the water approximately 3-5
miles from the beach in the South China Sea. After landing he
shouted for Lieutenant JG Marik and fired his weapon into the air
but never received a response. An airborne SAR force rescued
Commander Weber but was unable to locate any trace of Marik after
a four hour search.

Lieutenant JG Marik was declared missing in action. Returning U.S.
POWs had no information on his precise fate. In May 1973 he was
declared killed in action, body not recovered, based on a
presumptive finding of death.



South Vietnam Robert H. Gage
(0381)

See Vessey Discrepancy Cases for case summary.


North Vietnam Roosevelt Hestle, Jr.
Charles E. Morgan
(0386)

See Vessey Discrepancy Cases for case summary.



North Vietnam George H. Wilkins
(0391)

On July 11, 1966, Lieutenant Commander Wilkins was the pilot of an
A-4 and flight leader in a flight of two aircraft from the U.S.S.
Constellation on a mission over Nghe An Province. His wingman
later reported Commander Wilkins had fired 20mm cannon fire during
his target run beneath flares and in an area of heavy 37mm anti-
aircraft fire. His aircraft crashed into an area 25 kilometers
north of the port city of Vinh, exploding into a large fireball.
There was no evidence of any survivor and no electronic beeper. He
was declared killed in action, body not recovered, in July 1966.
Returning U.S. POWs had no information on his precise fate.

In December 1988, Vietnamese officials acknowledged having some
knowledge about Commander Wilkins. In December 1992, U.S.
investigators in Vietnam reviewed a list of air defense operations
in the People's Army of Vietnam Military Region 4. Entry 300
recorded the shoot down of an AD-4 on July 11, 1966 by elements of
the 15th and 21st Battalions. One crewman died. The Joint Task
Force concluded this entry may correlate to Commander Wilkins's
loss incident.



North Vietnam Bernard Conklin
Robert E. Hoskinson
Galileo F. Bossio
Vincent A. Chiarello
John M. Mamiya
Herbert A. Smith
James S. Hall
(0407)

On July 29, 1966, an RC-47D with seven men on board and associated
with the 630th Combat Support Group at Udorn Air Base, Thailand,
was on an operational mission under the code name Project Dogpatch.

The aircrew radioed that it was under attack by hostile aircraft
and was being forced down. It was believed last located 10-20
miles south of Sam Neua City, Sam Neua Province, Laos. An airborne
search effort to locate the missing aircraft and crew proved
negative and they were declared missing in action.

At the direction of the U.S. Ambassador in Vientiane, Laos, there
was no report made of the full details on this mission and the
evidence it was shot down by hostile MIG aircraft. At the
direction of the Assistant Secretary of Defense (International
Security Affairs), basic mission information was declassified in
April 1972. In January 1976 the loss location of the aircraft was
changed from Laos to North Vietnam based on a reanalysis of the
aircraft's flight path and all available intelligence information.

In February 1971, a former member of the Vietnam People's Army
reported that MIG jet aircraft had shot down a U.S. aircraft over
Mai Chau District, Hoa Binh Province, in June or July 1967. He
described seeing two good parachutes and saw the pilots whom he
later heard had committed suicide. U.S intelligence concluded this
report might correlate to the missing RC-47D and its crew. In a
later intelligence report, a source reported MIG-17 jet aircraft
shot down an unidentified jet aircraft in Moc Chau District, Son La
Province. One crew member, the pilot, reportedly bailed out and
died the next day. Bodies of five others were located and buried.
This report was placed in the file of those associated with this
loss incident.

Returning U.S. POWs had no information on the eventual fate of the
crew. After Operation Homecoming, they were declared dead body not
recovered based on a presumptive finding of death.

On March 2, 1988, Vietnam turned over identity cards of five of the
missing crewmen; Bossio, Hoskinson, Conklin, DiTomasso, and
Chiarello. Remains were also turned over and Vietnam linked the
remains to the those whose identity cards were turned over. U.S.
pathologists examined the remains and confirmed the remains
returned were those of James S. Hall, Bernard Conklin, Vincent A.
Chiarello, John M. Mamiya, and Herbert A. Smith. In November 1988,
a joint U.S./Vietnamese team visited the area of the crash site
near Route 6 in Thanh Hoa Province. Witnesses testified about
bodies found in the area after the incident. One survivor
suffering second degree burns was reportedly located and taken to
Mai Chau district hospital where he died the following day. No
evidence could be located of the crash site itself. One witness
also stated five bodies of crewmen from this incident had been
recovered by the Ministry of Defense five years earlier.



North Vietnam David J. Allinson
(0425)

On August 12, 1966, Captain Allinson was the pilot of the lead F-
105D in a flight of four aircraft on an armed reconnaissance
mission over Yen Bai Province. After striking a petroleum storage
area the flight leader led the flight against ground targets of
opportunity on a road in the area of the strike target. During
this mission Captain Allinson's aircraft was hit by hostile ground
fire. He ejected from his damaged aircraft and his wingman saw him
land in trees. However, there was no beeper and no voice contact
with him and a 40 minute search of the area failed to locate him.

Captain Allinson was initially declared missing in action.
Returning U.S. POWs had no information that he was seen alive in
captivity and were unable to describe his precise fate. In
November 1974 he was declared killed in action, body not recovered,
based on a presumptive finding of death.

In November 1969, a People's Army of Vietnam defector selected a
photograph of Captain Allinson as one of four individuals who
resembled one of two American POWs brought to the Hanoi anti-
aircraft headquarters. One of the individuals he identified was
correlated by DIA to an American POW who returned alive. This led
to identification of the second individual as an American POW who
was also repatriated and neither individual was Captain Allinson.

In November 1985, Vietnam provided evidence about Captain Allinson.

During an April 1991 Congressional delegation to Vietnam headed by
Senator John Kerry, the delegation received information about a
wartime shoot down which might correlate to Captain Allinson's loss
incident.



South Vietnam Robert L. Babula
Dennis R. Carter
Robert C. Borton
John L. Bodenschatz
(0439)

See Vessey Discrepancy Cases for case summary.



North Vietnam Hubert C. Nichols,Jr.
(0443)

On September 1, 1966, Nichols was scrambled from Thailand on a
search and rescue mission over Bo Trach District, Quang Binh, the
flight leader in a flight of two aircraft. While over the target
area he began to receive hostile antiaircraft fire. His wingman
was hit and turned back. He never saw Nichols after that point.

A Navy pilot later reported observing a crashed and burning
aircraft in the area Nichols was believed lost. A search and
rescue mission was launched but was unable to locate any signs of
life or any beeper. There was heavy antiaircraft in the area.

On September 6, 1966, Radio Hanoi announced the shoot down of a
number of aircraft on September 1, 1966. Only two aircraft were
lost on that date, Major Nichols' aircraft and Major Norman
Schmidt's aircraft. Major Schmidt was captured and died in
captivity. His remains were repatriated in March 1974. Major
Schmidt had been the object of Major Nichols search and rescue
mission.

Major Nichols was initially declared missing in action. In March
1978 he was declared dead/body not recovered. He was not confirmed
alive in the northern Vietnamese prison system.

A U.S. team in Vietnam recently reviewed documents which recorded
the shoot down of an aircraft and the apparent death of the pilot.
The date and location appear to correlate to this incident.



South Vietnam Lawrence B. Tatum
(0453)

See Vessey Discrepancy Cases for case summary.



North Vietnam John L. Robertson
(0459)

See Vessey Discrepancy Cases for case summary.



North Vietnam Clifton E. Cushman
(0471)

On September 25, 1966, Captain Cushman was the pilot of an F-105 in
a flight of three aircraft on a mission over North Vietnam. His
aircraft was hit by hostile fire and broke into pieces. His
ejection seat appeared to come out of the debris and a beeper was
heard but no chute was seen.

In April 1972 a U.S. Air Force interrogator debriefed a former
member of the Vietnam People's Army who stated that he saw a pilot
land in the area where Cushman was reported to have landed. The
airman was bleeding heavily from a head wound. He later died and
his body was buried by villagers. This report was initially
correlated by the Defense Intelligence Agency to a different
incident but in August 1981 was reevaluated and correlated to a
sighting of Captain Cushman. Information was received by the U.S.
Government that a French news agency had specifically referenced
Cushman by name as having been killed but no news article with such
information could ever be located.

Captain Cushman was initially reported missing in action and later
declared dead/body not recovered. He was not seen alive in the
northern Vietnamese prison system by returning U.S. POWs.

In November 1989 Vietnamese officials stated that Cushman died in
the crash of his aircraft. In April 1992 the Joint Casualty
Resolution Center heard from witnesses in Lang Son Province that
Cushman died of a bullet wound after landing. His remains were
buried and the burial site was later washed away.



North Vietnam William R. Andrews
(0482)

On October 5, 1966, Major Andrews and First Lieutenant Edward W.
Garland were the crew of an F-4C, one in a flight of four F-4
providing escort to two RB-66. Their flight received warning of
hostile MIG aircraft. Thirty seconds after a second such alert
their aircraft was hit by hostile fire, there was a violent
explosion in their tail, and their fire warning lights lit. Both
crewmen ejected and two good chutes were seen prior to the
aircraft's crash in Muong La District, Son La Province.

Search and rescue forces located Major Andrews standing beside his
parachute on their first pass over the area. On a later pass by
another aircraft he could not be located. Major Garland
established radio contact with the search and rescue forces but his
last transmission was "I'm hit, I'm losing consciousness."

The search and rescue forces located Lieutenant Garland and he was
rescued. During his post-recovery debriefing he stated he was in
contact on the ground with Major Andrews but didn't know his
precise location. At one point he heard voices and the sound of
small arms fire but didn't see anyone.

Following the shoot down, a People's Army of Vietnam unit reported
two crewmen had bailed one and one more had been captured. In a
later report, a unit stated that the captured pilot had not yet
recovered and in a later report a unit stated "the pilot died."
Another report on October 9th apparently referred to U.S. aircraft
attacked but there was seeming confusion about how many had been
captured and the condition of their health.

In July 1972, Secretary of Defense Laird referred to the case of
Captain Andrews as of one 14 cases where the Defense Department
knew he had been captured and North Vietnam had refused to provide
any information about him.

U.S. POWs repatriated during Operation Homecoming were unable to
provide any information about his precise fate. After Operation
Homecoming he was declared dead/body not recovered, based on a
presumptive finding of death.
In August 1985, Vietnamese officials turned over Major Andrews'
identity card to U.S. officials in Vietnam. In March 1990, a joint
U.S./Vietnamese team in Son La Province investigated Major Andrews
loss incident. They received information that the pilot was killed
during a rescue attempt and documents about the incident were at
the Son La Museum. In December 1990, Vietnam repatriated remains
said to be of Major Andrews. They were returned to the U.S. and
identified as his remains.



Over water James A. Beene
(0483)

On October 5, 1966, Lieutenant JG Beene was the flight leader and
pilot of an A-1 section aircraft from the U.S.S. Oriskany on an
armed reconnaissance mission over the coastal area of North Vietnam
between Cape Mui Ron and Thanh Hoa. While in an area 15 miles
south of Hon Mat Island, Lieutenant Beene entered the base of thick
cumulus clouds and never emerged. An oil slick was later sighted
on the ocean which might have come from submerged leaking fuel
tanks but no aircraft debris was located.

A SAR effort was unable to locate any specific trace of Lieutenant
Beene, and he was declared missing. His name was provided to
Vietnamese officials in Paris in October 1971, but no information
was received in return.

Returning U.S. POWs were unable to provide any information about
his precise fate. In February 1976 he was declared killed in
action, body not recovered.



Over water Stephen H. Adams
Ralph N. Angstadt
Lawrence Clark
John H. S. Long
Robert L. Hill
Inzar W. Rackley, Jr.
John R. Shoneck
(0496)

On October 18, 1966, a HU-16B aircraft disappeared while on a
search and rescue patrol north of the Demilitarized Zone. It was
last known returning to its home base at Da Nang while located 35
miles off the coast of North Vietnam. It never arrived at Da Nang,
and the crew was declared missing. In October 1975 this case was
concluded to be a non-recoverable case and the crew was declared
dead, body not recoverable.


South Vietnam Michael L. Burke
Leonard J. Lewandowski, Jr.
Richard E. Mishuk
(0497)

On October 19, 1966, U.S. Marine Corps privates Burke, Lewandowski,
and Mishuk were swimming in the ocean at the mouth of a river at
the Cua Viet estuary. They were gone from their unit for three
hours, never returned, and were declared missing.
Returning U.S. POWs had no information on their precise fate and
after Operation Homecoming they were declared dead/body not
recovered, based on a presumptive finding of death



North Vietnam Harry S. Edwards
(0500)


On October 29, 1966, Lieutenant JG Edwards was the pilot of an A-4C
when he was hit by hostile antiaircraft fire and his aircraft
crashed southwest of Nam Dinh City, Ha Nam Ninh Province. There
was no chute sighted and no beeper heard. He was initially
declared missing in action. He was declared dead/body not
recovered, in April 1974.

Wartime information was received about a crash in this area from
which remains were removed to Vu Ban District. A Vietnam People's
Army defector reported hearing from a woman with an antiaircraft
unit at the Chuoi Bridge. She described that in February 1967 a
U.S. aircraft was shot down and crashed. They were only able to
find the pilot's legs. This report was believed to be extremely
similar to the loss of Lieutenant Edwards.

In November 1988, Vietnam repatriated remains that it asserted were
those of Lieutenant Edwards. In February 1989, those remains were
proven to be those of Commander Charles E. Barrett.



Laos Allan D. Pittmann
(0524)

On November 16, 1966, Airman Second Class Allan Pittmann was a
passenger on an A1G aircraft flight from Nha Trang, South Vietnam,
to Udorn Air Base, Thailand. The aircraft was hit by hostile
ground fire, its engine lost power and the aircraft crashed in
Savannakhet Province, Laos. The pilot and co-pilot both bailed out
and were rescued 90 minutes later. During their post-recovery
debrief they reported that Airman Pittmann had also bailed out and
they last observed him alive on the ground.

Royal Lao Army and U.S. led irregular forces mounted a sweep on the
area on November 17 and again on November 18 in a directed effort
to recover Airman Pittmann. They located an enemy dispensary in
the general area of his disappearance. A villager just escaped
from Lao communist captivity contacted friendly forces on November
22 and stated that he was told by a Pathet Lao battalion commander
than an individual correlating to Pittmann was captured on the 17th
and was shot to death by the "VC."

Airman Pittmann was not reported alive in the northern Vietnamese
prison system and his remains have not yet been repatriated. He
was initially reported missing in action. He was declared
dead/body not recovered, in April 1978.



North Vietnam Burris N. Begley
(0542)

On December 5, 1966, Major Begley was the pilot of an F-105, one in
a flight of four aircraft on a combat mission over North Vietnam.
Their flight was attacked by hostile MIG-17 aircraft while en route
to the targets and Major Begley's aircraft was hit by hostile fire.

Another flight member observed his aircraft apparently hit in the
tail: debris and his drag chute were seen falling away from his F-
105.

Major Begley reported he was losing power and altitude and would be
heading across the Red River. He later reported he would be
ejecting, but aerial combat between the F-105 and MIG-17 aircraft
prevented U.S pilots from tracking Major Begley. His aircraft
crashed in Phu Tho Province, south of the Red River, and
approximately 15 miles from the river town of Yen Bai. There was
no chute observed and no radio or beeper signals.

Major Begley was declared missing in action. Returning U.S. POWs
had no information on his precise fate. In April 1978 he was
declared killed in action, body not recovered, based on a
presumptive finding of death.

In November 1974, U.S. intelligence received a report from a
People's Army of Vietnam defector describing the shoot down of a
U.S. aircraft and the landing and capture of a pilot in Phu Ninh
District circa January 1967. DIA concluded that this report might
correlate to one of three U.S. airmen lost in this area, one of
whom was Major Begley. Another report from a former People's Army
soldier described the downing of a U.S. jet in Phu Tho Province
circa November 1966 and the source reported human remains at the
crash site. This report was also placed on Major Begley's file.

In November 1986, Vietnam repatriated remains it asserted were
those of Major Begley. U.S. officials determined that there were
insufficient remains for biological identification and they could
not be correlated to Major Begley.



Laos Roy R. Kubley
Lloyd F. Walmer
Harvey Mulhauser
Ronald K. Miyazaki
Howard L. Barden
(0587)

On January 31, 1967, a UC-123B with a crew of five was engaged in
a defoliation mission over Laos, the lead in a flight of three C-
123 escorted by two A-1E aircraft. The C-123 was hit by hostile
groundfire, flipped inverted and crashed approximately 13
kilometers south of the town of Tchepone, Savannakhet Province.
There was no evidence of any survivors after the crash. In
February 1967 the UC-123B crew was declared killed in action, body
not recovered.

In August 26, 1992, a joint U.S./Lao team surveyed the aircraft's
reported crash site. Witnesses and wreckage appeared to correlate
the site to this loss incident but there were no remains or
personal effects discovered. One witness reported having seen
burned bone fragments on the scene but none were found during the
joint team's visit.



North Vietnam Allan P. Collamore
Donald E. Thompson
(0590)

On the night of February 4, 1967, Lieutenants Collamore and
Thompson were the crew of an F-4B launched from the U.S.S. Kitty
Hawk on a pitch black night assigned a mission against coastal
targets of opportunity in Nam Ha Province, North Vietnam. While
over the coastal strip, the other F-4B aircraft in their flight
dropped flares over moving light on a road but the flares failed to
ignite. The F-4B turned, made another flare drop, reported "flares
away," and this was acknowledged by Lieutenant Collamore's crew.
These flares also failed to ignite as the F-4B turned east and out
over the coast. Approximately one minute later came an explosion
on the ground in the area of the moving ground lights and efforts
to raise Lieutenant's Collamore and Thompson were unsuccessful. No
parachutes were seen due to the darkness, and no electronic beepers
were detected during the search and rescue effort over the loss
area.

Both airmen were initially reported missing in action. Returning
U.S. POWs had no information on their precise fate. Several years
after Operation Homecoming they were declared dead/body not
recovered.

In February 1973 a People's Army of Vietnam soldier reported that
in February 1967 he saw an aircraft crash in his native village in
Hai Hau District and close to the coast. Remains of two crewmen
were reportedly buried at the crash site. In October 1977 the
Defense Intelligence Agency reevaluated this report to be a
possible correlation to this loss incident. After 1975 a refugee
from Vietnam reported being told by a People's Army soldier in 1977
of two graves with U.S. remains in Ninh Province. This report was
placed in the files of those involved in this loss incident.
Another refugee from Vietnam reported being told of a remains
burial side in Phat Diem District, Ham Ha Province, associated with
a June 1967 loss incident and this report was also placed in those
involved in loss incidents in this general area.



Laos Ralph L. Carlock
(0606)

On March 4, 1967, Major Carlock departed Takhli Royal Thai Air
Force Base in an F-105D on an armed reconnaissance mission over
Laos. While attacking a truck, the flight leader saw Major
Carlock's aircraft hit by enemy fire in the lower center of the
fuselage and began to burn. The flight leader radioed Major
Carlock to bail out but did not receive a response. The aircraft
crashed in the area of Nong Het, Xieng Khouang Province, just
inside Laos from Nghe An Province, North Vietnam, and with no
evidence Major Carlock had parachuted from the aircraft prior to
the crash. Forty minutes later there was a weak beeper from the
vicinity of the crash site but it was believed to be a result of
fire at the crash site and was not pilot activated. Major Carlock
was declared missing in action.

On March 5, 1967, the pro-communist Patriotic Neutralist radio
station news service reported its forces in Long Met District,
Vientiane Province, had shot down a U.S. F-105 aircraft and
captured the pilot. U.S. intelligence concluded at the time that
this report may have been partially derived from the loss of Major
Carlock's aircraft which crashed in Xieng Khouang Province and not
in Vientiane Province and the report was not believed to represent
a truthful statement that the pilot had been captured.

Returning U.S. POWs had no information on the precise fate of Major
Carlock. After Operation Homecoming Major Carlock was declared
dead/body not recovered, based on a presumptive finding of death.

In June 1986, the Joint Casualty Resolution Center received
information from a source who described the crash of an aircraft
similar to an F-105 in Xieng Khouang Province which had occurred in
either 1971 of 1972. Two airmen reportedly died in the crash. In
September 1988, JCRC received another report from another source
describing a wartime F-105 crash near Nong Het. The pilot
reportedly bailed out at low altitude and died when he hit the
ground. The body was buried by local villagers accompanied by
Vietnamese advisory personnel. These reports were placed in Major
Carlock's file due to the correlation to his loss location and the
possibility they may have correlated to his loss incident.

In October 1990, JCRC received another report from another source
describing the October 1967 shoot down of a U.S. aircraft near Nong
Het. The pilot bailed out and the source was told the pilot was
captured by North Vietnamese Army forces. Due to a number of U.S.
aircraft losses in the area of this reported shoot down, some of
which involved unaccounted for airmen, no specific correlation
could be made to a particular missing airman and the report was
placed in the files of airmen unaccounted for in the None Het area.



South Vietnam Burt C. Small
(0607)

See Vessey Discrepancy Cases for case summary.



North Vietnam James E. Plowman
John C. Ellison
(0629)

On March 24, 1967, Commander Ellison and Lieutenant JG plowman were
the number three aircraft in a flight of four on a combat strike
mission against the Bac Giang Thermal Power Plant.
Nothing further was heard from them after they reported "bombs
away." Two hostile surface to air missile launches were reported
in the area before radio and radar contact was lost while they were
exiting the strike area and flying low between the mountains. Both
crewmen were declared missing in action when they failed to rejoin
their flight.

On March 26, 1967, Radio Beijing reported in its English language
program with a March 26th Hanoi dateline that one American aircraft
had been shot down on March 24th over Ha Bac Province. U.S. Naval
intelligence received a report believed associated with this loss
incident in which it placed "low confidence" that one or two were
killed. In May 1968, another report was received which referenced
two Americans seen outside Tran Phu Prison in Hai Phong City in
mid-1967. The similarity in the physical description of the two
captives and that of the two airmen lost in this incident led to
this report being placed in both their file for reference purposes.

One of Lieutenant Plowman's next of kin believed Plowman was one of
those seen near Tran Phu Prison. After Operation Homecoming DIA
determined this report correlated to U.S. POWs who were repatriated
alive.

Neither crewman was accounted for during Operation Homecoming.
However, one returnee reported having been shown a picture of 10 or
12 U.S. POWs being paraded and was positive that Lieutenant
Commander Ellison was in the front row of the U.S. POWs. DIA later
determined the scene described by the U.S. POW returnee referred to
a notorious July 6, 1966, public exhibition of U.S. POWs marched
through Hanoi streets, an incident which occurred prior to the loss
of Commander Ellison, and those forced to march in this spectacle
were all identified. During the war, Commander Ellison's next-of-
kin reviewed then as yet unidentified photographs of U.S. POWs and
believed one was of her husband. It was later confirmed to be a
photograph of Major Berg who returned alive. An early releasee
also reported learning of the name Buzz Ellison while in the North
Vietnamese prison system but returnees during Operation Homecoming
had no knowledge he was alive in captivity. This was one of
approximately 350 names the early releasee provided based on names
written on toilet paper without any context for these names. In
another report, a returnee stated he had seen Commander Ellison's
name etched into a tree near a wartime prison referred to by U.S.
POWs as Dogpatch.

In March 1992, Commander Ellison's personal effects and metal items
were repatriated by Vietnam.


North Vietnam John F. O'Grady
(0641)

On April 10, 1967, Major O'Grady was the pilot of an F-105D, one in
a flight of four F-105s on an armed reconnaissance mission over the
Mu Gia Pass, North Vietnam. He was apparently hit by hostile
ground fire and radioed he was preparing to exit the aircraft. His
parachute was seen in the air and on the ground. There was no
beeper and no radio contact after ejection. His aircraft impact
point was not observed. Major O'Grady was initially declared
missing in action.

On April 11, 1967, Radio Hanoi broadcast a reference to the shoot
down of a U.S. aircraft in Quang Binh Province on April 10, 1967.
Major O'Grady's aircraft was the only one lost on that day. Mrs.
O'Grady later traveled to Paris and spoke with North Vietnamese
representatives who informed her that her husband was not a
prisoner of war.

In January 1991 a U.S. field team examined Vietnamese archives
which indicated an American F-105 was shot down on April 10, 1967,
by elements of the 280th Air Defense Regiment in the area where
Major O'Grady was downed. The information provided stated the body
of the pilot was recovered and buried along Route 12. The U.S.
field team interviewed five witnesses, three of whom provided
hearsay information concerning the shoot down and the death of the
pilot shortly after capture. Two other witnesses provided first
hand accounts of his capture in Tuyen Hoa District, Quang Binh
Province, his turnover to a Vietnam People's Army engineer unit and
hearsay that he later died. His death was said to have occurred on
April 11th which was at variance with the documents which said
death occurred on April 10th. An examination of a possible burial
site proved negative.

In February 1992, U.S. investigators located the identity card,
Geneva Convention Card and Restricted Area Access Badge belonging
to Major O'Grady. They were also able to interview a former senior
officer from the 280th Air Defense Regiment. From available
information Major O'Grady was wounded when captured by local
village militia and died four hours later.



North Vietnam John S. Hamilton
(0644)

See Vessey Discrepancy Cases for case summary.



South Vietnam Thomas A. Mangino
Paul A. Hasenbeck
David M. Winters
Daniel R. Nidds
(0646)

See Vessey Discrepancy Cases for case summary.



South Vietnam Roger D. Hamilton
(0647)

See Vessey Discrepancy Cases for case summary.



North Vietnam Michael J. Estocin
(0656)

See Vessey Discrepancy Cases for case summary.




North Vietnam Roger M. Netherland
(0677)

See Vessey Discrepancy Cases for case summary.



South Vietnam Carlos Ashlock
(0678)

See Vessey Discrepancy Cases for case summary.




Cambodia Joe L. Delong
(0689)

See Vessey Discrepancy Cases for case summary.



North Vietnam James K. Patterson
(0691)

On May 19, 1967, Lieutenant Patterson and Lieutenant Commander
Eugene B. McDaniel were the crew of an A-6A, one in a flight of six
aircraft on a combat mission against the Van Dien repair facility
five miles south of Hanoi. There was a warning of a missile launch
and an explosion near their aircraft. Both crewmen ejected and two
good chutes were seen. Voice contact was established with both on
the ground and Lieutenant Patterson reported he had a badly broken
leg. A rescue mission was not possible due to the high hostile
threat in the area.

Contact with those on the ground continued until May 22nd when it
was lost. Both were believed to have been captured. Commander
McDaniel returned alive during Operation Homecoming.

Commander McDaniel believed that Lieutenant Patterson had been
captured. He heard from an interrogator that Patterson had been
injured but was all right. Patterson's name was heard in the
prison communications system according to one returnee but he was
not confirmed alive in the prison system. His identity card was
reported in a newspaper in 1967.

Lieutenant Patterson was not accounted for during Operation
Homecoming. In April 1974 he was declared dead/body not recovered.



In December 1985 Vietnam returned the identity and Geneva
Convention cards of Lieutenant Patterson. In December 1990, a U.S.
field team in Vietnam located documents and interviewed witnesses
associated with this loss. One pilot was described captured the
morning after their aircraft was shot down. That accurately
describes the time of capture of Commander McDaniel. The team was
also told that the second airman was shot to death by militia on
the fourth day after the shoot down and was buried nearby. His
remains were said to have been dug up by animals.
The team did not excavate any purported grave site.



South Vietnam Walter F. Wrobleski
(0703)


See Vessey Discrepancy Cases for case summary.



North Vietnam Kenneth F. Backus
Elton L. Perrine
(0706)

See Vessey Discrepancy Cases for case summary.



South Vietnam Brian K. McGar
Joseph E. Fitzgerald
John E. Jakovac
(0715)

See Vessey 135 Discrepancy Cases for case summary.



South Vietnam Di Reyes Ibanez
(0723)

See Vessey 135 Discrepancy Cases for case summary.



South Vietnam Robert L. Platt, Jr.
(0728)

See Vessey 135 Discrepancy Cases for case summary.





Laos Leo E. Seymour
(0750)

On July 3, 1967, Staff Sergeant Seymour was team leader of Team
Texas, a joint U.S./Vietnamese patrol on a covert cross border
mission into Attopeu Province, Laos, opposite Kontum Province,
South Vietnam. They were discovered and engaged by a People's Army
of Vietnam force. The team split up but when it was reassembled,
SSG Seymour could not be found. U.S. search and rescue aircraft
supporting the recovery of the team's survivors reported seeing one
man who was to the rear of the team, was wearing green fatigue
clothing and raised his weapon at them. He was shot and killed by
the rescue aircraft who concluded he was a North Vietnamese.

In April 1970 a North Vietnamese Army prisoner reported having seen
a U.S. POW at way station 20 in Quang Binh Province. The American
was a fluent Vietnamese linguist. U.S. intelligence files contain
this report as conceivably correlating to SSG Seymour; however,
this correlates with the time when former U.S. Marine Corps Private
Robert Garwood, fluent in Vietnamese, could have transversed the
area after being taken from South Vietnam to North Vietnam.

SSG Seymour was initially declared missing. He was not reported
alive in the northern Vietnamese prison system and his remains have
not been repatriated. In April 1976 he was declared dead/body not
recovered.



North Vietnam Ronald N. Sittner
(0804)
Charles Lane, Jr.
(0805)

See Vessey 135 Discrepancy Cases for case summary.
 

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